Feb 12, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Sen. Michael Bennet ends 2020 presidential campaign

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) dropped out of the 2020 presidential race on Tuesday evening, per AP.

The big picture: Bennet brought a moderate tilt to the Democratic stage, favoring incremental steps to broaden health care coverage versus Medicare for All, and working with a group of Senate Democrats that moved to deregulate banks.

  • While such middle-left stances could have been marketable in previous elections, they fell short this cycle. In both polling and debates, Bennet failed to have any major breakaway moments, leaving him off the October, November and December debate stages and solidifying his campaign's demise.

What's next: Bennet is not up for re-election in the Senate until 2022.

Go deeper: 2020 presidential election: Track which candidates are running

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Andrew Yang drops out of 2020 presidential race

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang announced on Tuesday night that he has dropped out of the 2020 presidential race.

The big picture: Yang, who's never held public office, centered his campaign on universal basic income, wherein he proposed giving all Americans over 18 years of age $1,000 every month.

Apple makes its debate debut

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Apple will co-host its first-ever political debate Friday in an effort to show off its growing investment in news.

Why it matters: Apple's role in tonight's Democratic debate in New Hampshire comes as two of the biggest tech giants, Facebook and Google, are noticeably absent from the debates this season.

John Delaney drops out of 2020 presidential race

John Delaney. Photo: Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Former Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.) announced Friday that he was dropping out of the 2020 presidential race.

The big picture: Delaney was the first Democrat to announce his candidacy in the 2020 election, yet failed to establish himself once the field grew. In July, Axios reported that Delaney's staff had asked him to drop out, suggesting he wasn't spending enough money to run a competitive race and had flopped at the first debate.