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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Since it was first popularized more than a year ago by actress Alyssa Milano, the #MeToo hashtag has been used over 19 million times, and 75% of public officials accused in the U.S. of sexual misconduct will be out of office by the new year.

The big picture: #MeToo has rocked a number of institutions previously resistant to believing victims of sexual misconduct, with more expected to come.

Politics

It was the year of the woman, in more ways than one.

  • A record-setting number of women won seats in Congress in November's midterms.
  • The Senate and the House came to an agreement on a bill which tackles the process staffers and lawmakers undergo when accusing a colleague of sexual misconduct.
  • The #MeToo movement was part of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, after he was accused of sexual misconduct.
  • Flashback: President Trump joked about the rules of #MeToo at a Pennsylvania rally, saying it kept him from using the phrase "the woman who got away."
Tech

Silicon Valley has a big sexual harassment problem that it was forced to start tackling.

Religion

Religious institutions around the world had to face their histories of abuse.

Media
  • CBS had its year of reckoning, giving CEO Les Moonves the boot, along with settling with accusers of Charlie Rose and an actress who says she was retaliated against for reporting sexual misconduct.
  • Photojournalists broke their silence about harassment in the industry.
  • The Miss America pageant rebranded as a result of the #MeToo movement.
Education
Around the globe

It wasn't just the U.S. — men and women around the world said enough is enough.

Go deeper: #MeToo shows no signs of slowing down

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.