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A demonstration for women's rights. Photo: Adam Berry/Getty Images

Of the 138 elected and appointed officials accused of sexual misconduct in the last election cycle, 104 will be out of office by January 2019, according to a new study by Georgetown Law Professor Jamillah Bowman Williams.

The big picture: The #MeToo movement swept across industries, and confronted politicians from state legislature to the top of federal government. Men accounted for 135 of the officials accused of harassment, assault, violence against women, or other sexual misconduct.

Details: Williams' research identifies the accused as 14 members of Congress, 84 state lawmakers, 13 other elected officials, 25 appointed officials and two former government officials currently running for office.

  • 18 of them were accused in the 10 months leading up to the #MeToo movement's beginning; the other 120 were accused after the news of Harvey Weinstein broke.
  • 77 of those accused were not in the running for re-election on Tuesday because they decided against it, resigned, or retired. Two committed suicide.
  • 9 officials were removed from office.
  • 15 lost their primaries.

Yes, but: 27 officials ran for office again in the midterms, and 23 were re-elected or elected to new positions. One race is headed for a recount. Williams writes in the report that voters "were focused on other political issues, such as health care, immigration, and the economy."

  • The accusations against those 27 range from negligence — including Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) — to a rape accusation against State Sen. Joe Fain (R-Washington). They also include harassment, domestic violence, and sexual assault.
  • Two of those 27 lost their races to women.

The bottom line: The #MeToo movement had a profound impact on the conversation around sexual harassment and assault, and in encouraging survivors to come forward and confront their abusers. But it's unlikely this is nearing its end.

Go deeper

CPAC Republicans choose conservatism over constituents

Rep. Matt Gaetz. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images

CPAC proved such a draw, conservative Republicans chose the conference over their constituents.

Why it matters: More than a dozen House Republicans voted by proxy on the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill in Washington so they could speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC. And Sen. Ted Cruz skipped an Air Force One flight as President Biden flew to Cruz's hometown of Houston to survey storm damage.

Border Democrat warns Biden about immigrant fallout

Henry Cuellar (right). Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

A Democratic lawmaker representing a border district warned the Biden administration against easing up too much on unauthorized immigrants, citing their impact on his constituents, local hospitals and their potential to spread the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas) told Axios he supports President Biden. But the moderate said he sees the downsides of efforts to placate pro-immigrant groups, an effort that threatens to blow up on the administration.

In CPAC speech, Trump says he won't start a 3rd party

Trump at CPAC on Feb. 28 in Orlando, Florida. Photo: Courtesy of C-SPAN.

In his first public speech since leaving office, former President Trump told the audience at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) that he would not start a third party because "we have the Republican party."

Why it matters: The former president aims to cement himself as Republicans' "presumptive 2024 nominee" as his top contenders — including former members of his administration — face the challenge of running against the GOP's most popular politician.