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New data shows depth of U.S. mental health crisis

U.S. suicide rates are at the highest level since World War II, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, per Bloomberg's Cynthia Koons.

By the numbers: From 2000 to 2006, the suicide rate in the U.S. increased by an average of about 1% a year. From 2006 through 2016, it increased by 2% a year. There were 1.4 million suicide attempts in 2017 and 47,000 deaths.

Why it matters: Despite an improvement of material well-being, emotional distress in the U.S. has reached "crisis levels," according to the CDC.

  • Koons reports that the national mental health epidemic stems from various causes, including "genetic, social, and environmental factors."
  • It's reached the scale of "the global financial crisis" — and yet there is no groundwork in policy, manpower or in institutions to address it.

Go deeper: Generation Z's suicide epidemic

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) provides 24/7, free and confidential support for anyone in distress, in addition to prevention and crisis resources. Also available for online chat.

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