The suicide rate for Americans aged 15 to 24 years old — the older half of Generation Z — is the highest it's been since at least 1999, according to Centers for Disease Control data.

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Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chart: Axios Visuals

The big picture: The overall suicide rate for this age group has risen by 51% over the past decade. This has been accompanied by increased social media use, anxiety, depression and self-inflicted injuries among young adults and teens, according to a newly released study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

  • The closing gap: Young men still have significantly higher suicide rates than women of the same age, but over the last decade, suicide rates for women aged 15 to 24 have risen faster than for men.
  • Suicide rates for Gen Z men have risen 45% since 2007, compared to 87% for women.

Between the lines: The rise in suicide rates could be a result of more accurate reporting, with Americans more willing to label a death as suicide, according to the JAMA study. It could also be driven by changes in the use of opioids or the increased prevalence of depression in young people.

Go deeper: Deaths by suicide, drugs and alcohol reached an all-time high in 2017

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) provides 24/7, free and confidential support for anyone in distress, in addition to prevention and crisis resources. Also available for online chat.

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Grand jury indicts ex-officer who shot Breonna Taylor for wanton endangerment

A memorial to Breonna Taylor in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Sept. 23. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

A grand jury has indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March and shot her at least eight times, on three counts of wanton endangerment.

The state of play: None of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid will face charges related to the actual death of Taylor, such as homicide or manslaughter. Two officers were not charged at all.

FDA chief vows agency will not accept political pressure on coronavirus vaccine

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn promised that "science will guide our decision" for a coronavirus vaccine at a Senate hearing on Wednesday.

Why it matters: More Americans are expressing doubt about a first-generation vaccine, despite President Trump's efforts to push an unrealistic timeline that conflicts with medical experts in his administration.

CEO confidence rises for the first time in over 2 years

Data: Business Roundtable; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A closely-watched CEO economic confidence index rose for the first time after declining for nine straight quarters, according to a survey of 150 chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies by trade group Business Roundtable.

Why it matters: The index, which still remains at a decade low, reflects corporate America's expectations for sales, hiring and spending — which plummeted amid uncertainty when the pandemic hit.

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