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Sen. Martha McSally on May 6 in Washington, DC. Photo: Shawn Thew via Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Martha McSally (R-Ariz) told NBC News that if Democrats take the Senate and grant statehood to Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico, Republicans would "never get the Senate back again."

Why it matters: McSally is facing a challenge from astronaut Mark Kelly in a competitive race that many believe could determine the balance of the Senate. "This is just the implications of this seat, the implications of this vote," McSally said after claiming that Democrats would get four new senators with D.C. and Puerto Rico statehood.

The big picture: Puerto Rico and D.C. have pushed to become states for years. The House voted largely along party lines in June to recognize D.C., which is 45% Black and has voted overwhelmingly Democratic in recent years, as a state.

What she's saying: "There's so much at stake here. They're gonna make D.C. and Puerto Rico a state and get four new Democratic senators, we'd never get the Senate back again. ... It's not just about whether you like astronauts or fighter pilots. This is about — my opponent's first vote is for Chuck Schumer."

Flashback: President Trump said in May that Washington, D.C., will never become a state because Republicans wouldn't agree to giving Democrats more seats in Congress.

Go deeper: Arizona Senate candidate Mark Kelly raised $12.8 million in Q2

Go deeper

Updated Nov 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The latest: Biden's Georgia win

Expand chart
Data: AP; Note: AP has called Arizona for Biden, but ballots are still being counted and not all organizations have called it yet. Chart: Naema Ahmed, Andrew Witherspoon, Danielle Alberti/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's projected Georgia win will give him 306 electoral votes over President Trump — virtually matching Trump's margin over Hillary Clinton in 2016.

The latest: Trump has not yet conceded after Biden surpassed the 270 electoral vote threshold needed to capture the presidency. Instead, his legal team, led by Rudy Giuliani, has been spinning baseless conspiracy theories and throwing out evidence-free accusations of fraud.

Updated 4 hours ago - World

Skripal poisoning suspects linked to Czech blast, as country expels 18 Russians

Combined images released by British police in 2018 of Alexander Petrov (L) and Ruslan Boshirov, who are suspected of carrying out an attack in the in the southern English city of Salisbury using Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent, and also the2014 Czech depot explosion. Photo: Metropolitan Police via Getty Images

Czech police on Saturday connected two Russian men suspected of carrying out a poisoning attack in Salisbury, England, with a deadly ammunition depot explosion southeast of the capital, Prague, per Reuters.

Driving the news: Czech officials announced Saturday they're expelling 18 Russian diplomats they accuse of being involved in the blast in Vrbětice, AP notes. Czech police said later they're searching for two men carrying several passports — including two with the names Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov.

Indianapolis mass shooting suspect legally bought 2 guns, police say

Marion County Forensic Services vehicles are parked at the site of a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Friday. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

The suspected gunman in this week's mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally purchased two "assault rifles" believed to have been used in the attack, police said late Saturday.

Of note: The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's statement that Brandon Scott Hole, 19, bought the rifles last July and September comes a day after the FBI told news outlets that a "shotgun was seized" from the suspect in March 2020 after his mother raised concerns about his mental health.