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D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser holds a press conference on statehood on June 16. Photo: Amanda Voisard for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The House voted to recognize Washington, D.C., as a state largely along party lines, 232-180.

Why it matters: The vote marks the first time that either chamber has voted to recognize the District as a state, although the bill is doomed in the Senate.

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said that the bill will not be taken up in the Republican-controlled Senate, Politico reports.
  • President Trump has said Republicans would never agree to giving Democrats more seats in Congress.

What they're saying, via Axios' Alayna Treene: Ahead of Friday’s vote, Pelosi described the “injustice” against D.C.’s residents: “For more than two centuries, the residents of Washington D.C., the District of Columbia, have been denied their right to fully participate in their democracy,” Pelosi said during a news conference.

  • “Instead, they have been dealt the injustice of paying taxes, proudly serving in uniform in great numbers and contributing to the economic power of our nation while being denied the full enfranchisement which is their right.”
  • D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has also been a vocal proponent of the legislation. “Let’s fight back against the cries that we are too liberal or too black or too many Democrats,” she said at a press conference Thursday.

Worth noting: The nation's capital has voted overwhelmingly Democratic in recent years, with Trump picking up around 4% of the vote in 2016. Nearly 86% of D.C. residents supported statehood in the same election.

Go deeper ... Q&A: How Washington, D.C., Would Become a State (WSJ)

Go deeper

5 vulnerable GOP senators vote to protect Affordable Care Act from Trump lawsuit

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.) in the background, in February 2018. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Six Republican senators, five of whom are up for re-election in 2020, sided with Democrats on Thursday in a procedural vote to block the Trump administration from supporting a lawsuit that would dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

Why it matters: The final vote on the motion was 51-43, failing to reach the necessary 60-vote threshold to pass. But the move by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) forced several vulnerable GOP senators to go on the record on whether they support the lawsuit, which could strip protections from pre-existing conditions for millions of Americans.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.