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Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged a range of mistakes on Wednesday, including allowing most of its two billion users to have their public profile data scraped by outsiders. However, even as he took responsibility, he maintained he was the best person to fix the problems he created.

Why it matters: Zuckerberg is under unprecedented pressure after the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, which lawmakers will grill him about when he testifies before Congress next week. “We’re probably a year into a massive three-year push,” he said. “These are big issues.”

What he’s saying:

  • Zuckerberg is “quite confident given our analysis” that no more than 87 million were affected by the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Zuckerberg said it could be less.
  • Most of Facebook's users could have had data from their public profiles scraped by third parties.
  • He’s not going anywhere. Asked if the board discussed that he should step down as chairman, Zuckerberg replied, "Not that I’m aware of." And asked if he was the best person to run the company, he said yes.
  • He hasn’t fired anyone during the Cambridge Analytica fallout. “I started this place, I run it, I’m responsible for what happens here,” he said.
  • The company is weighing its legal options against Cambridge Analytica. “What we have said and they’ve agreed to is a full forensic audit of their systems so we can get those answers,” he said, but that won't happen until after the U.K. government and IPO finish their investigation.
  • Facebook "worked hard" to comply with a 2012 Federal Trade Commission settlement that requires the company to abide by certain privacy promises.
  • Zuckerberg said that contrary to a Reuters report, the company is open to offering features similar to those covered under GDPR, the sweeping European privacy regulation that will go into effect in May. “The reporter asked me if I was planning on running [privacy] controls across the world and my answer was yes," he said. "Will it be the exact same format? Probably not."

Financial impact: The chief executive claimed he has yet to see a meaningful decline in users, usage or advertising. “I don’t think there’s been any meaningful impact that we’ve observed,” he said. “But look, it’s not good. I don’t want anyone to be unhappy with our services."

The bigger picture: Before Zuckerberg spoke to reporters, Facebook announced a crackdown on third-party access to its data and said that up to 87 million users' information might have been passed along to the Trump-linked Cambridge Analytica.

What's next: Zuckerberg will testify before a key House panel next week.

Go deeper

Rep. Rice demands Cuomo resign after third woman accuses him of misconduct

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo during a February news conference in New York City. Photo: Seth Wenig/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-N.Y.) on Monday evening called for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) to resign, after a third woman accused him of inappropriate behavior.

Driving the news: Anna Ruch told the New York Times Monday that Cuomo asked to kiss her at a New York City wedding reception in September 2019.

Scoop: Inside the GOP's plan to retake the House

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Republicans will reclaim their majority in 2022 by offering candidates who are women, minorities or veterans, a memo obtained by Axios says.

Why it matters: The document, drafted by a super PAC blessed by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, names top Democrats to target — Jared Golden of Maine, Matt Cartwright of Pennsylvania and Ron Kind of Wisconsin — and the type of Republican candidates to beat them.

Scoop: Trump talked out of early Ohio endorsement

Jane Timken at a 2017 Trump rally. Photo: Kyle Mazza/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Donald Trump had to be talked out of making an early endorsement in Ohio's 2022 U.S. Senate race, a sign of his eagerness to reengage politically, people familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

What we're hearing: The former president discussed endorsing former state GOP chair Jane Timken last week during a meeting at Mar-a-Lago with RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, but top advisers — including Donald Trump Jr. — urged him to wait.

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