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People maintaining the decorations around a memorial for Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, in September. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

The Louisville Metro Police Department on Tuesday notified two detectives connected to the police shooting of Breonna Taylor that they would be fired, the Courier-Journal reports.

Why it matters: If fired, they would be the latest officers held accountable in the shooting that set off weeks of protests in the city and inspired nationwide demonstrations.

Context: Taylor was shot dead by police on March 13 when LMPD officers conducting a narcotics investigation barged into the 26-year-old's home in plain-clothes to serve a "no-knock" warrant.

  • Police exchanged fire with Taylor's boyfriend, who said he fired believing the home was being broken into.
  • Protests over Taylor's death erupted in Louisville in May following the police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota. The Louisville Metro Council has since banned no-knock warrants.

The big picture: Detective Joshua Jaynes received a pretermination letter Tuesday from interim Chief Yvette Gentry after an internal investigation found he had violated department procedures while preparing the no-knock search warrant for Taylor's apartment, according to the Courier-Journal.

  • Detective Myles Cosgrove, who the FBI concluded fired the shot that killed Taylor, also received a pretermination letter.
  • A grand jury in September indicted detective Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments while entering Taylor's home.

Of note: Jaynes and his lawyer have a closed hearing with interim Chief Gentry staff Thursday morning to convince the chief that his firing is unwarranted.

Go deeper

Capitol Police officer dies from injuries suffered during pro-Trump riot

Police spray supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump as they storm the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) officer Brian Sicknick has died from injuries he sustained while responding to the siege on the Capitol by a mob of President Trump supporters, the department said in a statement late Thursday.

The big picture: The officer's death is the fifth confirmed death stemming from the riot. A Capitol Police officer shot and killed Ashli Babbitt inside the Capitol, one woman died after being crushed during the breach, and two men died because of "medical emergencies," D.C. police said earlier on Thursday.

Capitol Police chief resigns amid pressure after mob breach

Capitol Police chief Steven Sund. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Capitol Police chief Steven Sund will resign next week, a spokesperson confirmed to Axios.

Driving the news: Sund's resignation, effective Jan. 16, comes amid pressure from lawmakers, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and the union representing the Capitol Police over the department's response to Wednesday's violent Capitol breach by a mob supporting President Trump.

Stalemate over filibuster freezes Congress

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell's inability to quickly strike a deal on a power-sharing agreement in the new 50-50 Congress is slowing down everything from the confirmation of President Biden's nominees to Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

Why it matters: Whatever final stance Schumer takes on the stalemate, which largely comes down to Democrats wanting to use the legislative filibuster as leverage over Republicans, will be a signal of the level of hardball we should expect Democrats to play with Republicans in the new Senate.