Mar 20, 2024 - News

San Diego's springs are getting cooler, bucking national trend

Data: Climate Central; Chart: Axios Visuals
Data: Climate Central; Chart: Axios Visuals

San Diego's spring seasons have been getting cooler, particularly over the last decade.

Why it matters: The average temperature drops aren't drastic, but they contrast a nationwide trend that reflects human-caused climate change, per recent research.

By the numbers: Springtime in San Diego cooled by 1.6°F on average between 1970 and 2023, per Climate Central, a climate research and communications nonprofit.

  • That's compared to warming of 2.2°F on average across nearly 230 U.S. cities.

The past decade has seen average temperatures in San Diego drop but remain in the low to mid-60s, peaking in 2014 at 66°F.

Between the lines: Climate Central's analysis is based on NOAA data and looks at meteorological spring, which runs March-May.

The big picture: Nationwide, warmer springtime temperatures cause a variety of knock-on effects, per Climate Central, including earlier snowmelt (which in turn affects drinking water supplies), longer allergy seasons, changes in agricultural growing seasons and more.

Zoom in: Locally, the cooler, wet weather means brighter blooms at Anza-Borrego Desert State Park and the Carlsbad Flower Fields.

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