Feb 12, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Former Goldman Sachs CEO: "If I'm Russian, I go with Sanders this time around"

Photos: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images; Michael Cohen/Getty Images for The New York Times

Former Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein tweeted late Tuesday that Bernie Sanders should garner the support of Russia in the 2020 presidential election if it wants "to best screw up the U.S."

"If Dems go on to nominate Sanders, the Russians will have to reconsider who to work for to best screw up the US. Sanders is just as polarizing as Trump AND he’ll ruin our economy and doesn’t care about our military. If I’m Russian, I go with Sanders this time around."

Why it matters: It's a notable direct criticism of Sanders from a billionaire member of the financial industry's elite.

The other side: "This is what panic from the Wall Street elite looks and sounds like," Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir responded.

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Sanders calls former Clinton adviser James Carville a "political hack"

2020 candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders during the Democratic presidential primary debate at Drake University on in Des Moines on Jan. 14. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders responded on CNN Wednesday after a former Wall Street chief claimed he'd "ruin the economy" if elected president and a veteran Democratic strategist said it'd be the "end of days" if he were the party's nominee.

Details: On "Anderson Cooper 360°," Sanders dismissed James Carville, a former adviser to ex-President Clinton, as a "political hack who said very terrible things ... against Barack Obama." Noting former Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein had "attacked" him, Sanders said: "We are taking on the establishment ... [But] the grassroots movement that we are putting together of young people, of working people, of people of color, want real change."

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What to watch in tonight's Democratic debate

Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in Colorado. Photo: Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Bernie Sanders is now the clear front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, and his opponents are ready to try to knock him down at tonight's debate in Charleston, South Carolina — especially Michael Bloomberg, who was the punching bag at the Las Vegas debate.

Why it matters: This is the last debate before Super Tuesday, when Sanders is expected to win California and Texas and could secure an insurmountable lead for the Democratic nomination. That's a direct threat to the entire field, but especially to Bloomberg, who skipped the early states to focus on the March 3 contests.

Bernie Sanders' rise forces media to reckon with how to cover him

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Staff

Bernie Sanders' rise is forcing news outlets to come to terms with ways they should covering his candidacy as a frontrunner, instead of a fringe candidate.

Why it matters: The media finds itself in the same position as it was in the 2016 election, when Donald Trump began to pull ahead in the Republican primary.