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Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) tweeted Sunday that he will grant Democrats' request to call former special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before his committee.

The big picture: The announcement comes on the heels of Mueller publishing an op-ed in the Washington Post that defended the Russia investigation and conviction of Roger Stone, whose sentence was commuted by President Trump on Friday.

  • Mueller testified to the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees in July last year, following the release of his 448-page report to Congress. The 75-year-old former FBI director was criticized for appearing confused and unfamiliar with some aspects of the report.
  • Graham, who is leading one of several investigations into the origins of the Russia probe and alleged misconduct by the FBI, has previously said that he's "done with the Mueller report" and wants to move on.

What he's saying: "Apparently Mr. Mueller is willing - and also capable - of defending the Mueller investigation through an oped in the Washington Post." Graham tweeted.

  • "Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee have previously requested Mr. Mueller appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee to testify about his investigation."

Go deeper: Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

Go deeper

Senate Judiciary to vote on Amy Coney Barrett confirmation next week

Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 14 in Washington, DC. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination will move forward with a committee vote on Oct. 22, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) announced Thursday, following standard procedure.

The big picture: Senate Republicans have said they plan to confirm Barrett with a full floor vote before Election Day — only 12 days after the committee vote.

Feinstein draws progressive fury after praising Graham at close of Barrett hearings

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, was widely criticized by liberal groups on Thursday after she gave Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) a hug and called Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation hearings “one of the best" that she's participated in.

Why it matters: Democrats have cast the Republican effort to confirm Barrett in an election year as "illegitimate," warning that it will shatter norms and transform the court for decades.

17 mins ago - Health

U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record

Expand chart
Data: COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

The United States reported 88,452 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, setting a single-day record, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

The big picture: The country confirmed 1,049 additional deaths due to the virus, and there are over 46,000 people currently being hospitalized, suggesting the U.S. is experiencing a third wave heading into the winter months.