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Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said Wednesday that he does not feel additional witnesses are needed in President Trump's impeachment trial — despite the Ukraine-linked revelations from former national security adviser John Bolton's unpublished manuscript.

The state of play: In a statement, Graham argued that "one could assume everything attributable to John Bolton is accurate and still the House case would fall well below the standards to remove a president from office."

  • Republican leadership has moved to avoid calling witnesses, particularly Bolton, hoping to keep the trial short.
  • But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told his caucus Tuesday that the GOP does not currently have the votes to block witnesses.

Between the lines: Graham said that he was concerned about Bolton's credibility being attacked, saying "it makes it more likely some will feel the need to call him as a witness."

  • That's likely a reference to Trump lashing out at Bolton on Twitter on Wednesday morning. The president said the U.S. "would be in World War Six by now" if he had listened to his former national security head during his tenure.
  • Graham said that if Bolton were called as a witness, then it would be important "to call witnesses on other issues," implying that he'd support pushing for Hunter Biden to take the stand.

Go deeper: Manchin says he believes Hunter Biden is relevant impeachment witness

Go deeper

AOC: "Extremely important" that Biden offer Bernie Sanders a Cabinet position

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that she believes it's "extremely important" that Joe Biden offer Sen. Bernie Sanders and other progressive leaders Cabinet positions if he's elected president.

The big picture: Ocasio-Cortez was pressed repeatedly on policy differences between her and the more moderate Biden, including her opposition to fracking and support for Medicare for All. She responded that it would be a "privilege" and a "luxury" to be able to lobby a Biden administration on progressive issues, insisting that the focus right now should be on winning the White House.

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Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows defended Vice President Pence's decision to continue traveling and campaigning despite his exposure to aides who have tested positive for COVID-19, saying Sunday that Pence is exempt from CDC guidelines because he is "essential personnel."

Why it matters: CDC guidelines call for people who have been exposed to the virus to quarantine for 14 days. Meadows said on CNN's "State of the Union" that Pence will wear a mask when he travels and argued that "he's not just campaigning," pointing to the Israel-Sudan normalization agreement announced by the White House last week.

Halloween and COVID-19: What you need to know

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Celebrating Halloween and Día de los Muertos will be difficult and more isolated this year, but can still be done while minimizing harm to others.

Why it matters: Traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating, indoor parties, haunted houses, crowded cemeteries and communal candy bowls are all considered high-risk activities by the CDC.