Police run to cover at the scene of a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas. Photo: John Locher / AP

Las Vegas authorities say 59 people are dead and about 527 injured after a man opened fire on an outdoor concert late Sunday night. The suspect is Stephen Paddock, 64, a white male from Mesquite, NV.

The FBI said there were no apparent links to international terrorist organizations, but about 19 firearms were found in the hotel room from which he fired and 18 additional firearms, explosives, several thousand rounds of ammo were found in Paddock's home. Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said some of the weapons had scopes, and fertilizer and chemicals were found in his car.

  • Police said in a press release that Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel, across the street from the venue, and SWAT officers found him dead when they entered the room. There were about 19 firearms in the room.
  • The Department of Homeland Security said there was no "specific credible threat" to other public venues. The police said four crime scenes are currently being investigated (the hotel room, the venue, the suspect's home, and a fourth location).
  • Lombardo said an investigation remains ongoing into the suspect's girlfriend, who is in Tokyo.
  • For context: This is the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, passing the 2016 attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

Full coverage: How it unfolded ; Trump comments ; suspect identified ; brother speaks ; lawmakers react ; deadliest mass shootings

Details from the scene, per the NYT: "The shooting happened near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. Video posted online showed the country singer Jason Aldean performing outside the hotel at Route 91 Harvest, a country music festival, interrupted by the sound of automatic gunfire. The music stopped, and concertgoers ducked for cover. 'Get down,' one shouted. 'Stay down,' screamed another."

Footage from the scene, via AP:

"Everyone was running, people were getting trampled," concertgoer Jon Bessett told NBC. "We ran as quick as we could into hotel and tried to get on the elevator but couldn't get in. Everyone was running for safety."

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval weighed in on the attack Monday morning:

As did President Trump:

Editor's Note: This post has been corrected to note that Marilou Danley is believed to be Paddock's roommate, not his wife.

This is a breaking news post and will be updated as we learn more. Follow @axios on Twitter for the latest.

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