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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) responded to language from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) that suggested federal relief for state governments would amount to a "blue state bailout," calling it "complete nonsense" in an interview with Politico Playbook.

Why it matters: Hogan, a Republican and the chairman of the National Governors' Association, has been among the loudest voices sounding the alarm over the massive state revenue shortfalls caused by the coronavirus. He predicted Maryland would have $2.8 billion budget deficit by July 1.

What he's saying: "That's complete nonsense," Hogan said about McConnell's comments. "These are well-run states. There are just as many Republicans as Democrats that strongly support this."

  • "I'm hopeful that we're going to be able to — between the administration and the 55 governors in America, including the territories — we're going to convince Sen. McConnell that maybe he shouldn't let all the states go bankrupt."

The big picture: Hogan's comments come as Congress prepares to move on to its phase four coronavirus relief legislation, which Democrats hope will include funding for state and local governments. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday that President Trump has agreed to push for the funding.

  • McConnell, meanwhile, told conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt on Wednesday that he didn't want to "just send a blank check down to states and local governments to spend anyway they choose to." He instead suggested allowing them to file for bankruptcy.
  • Cuomo responded by calling McConnell's bankruptcy suggestion "one of the really dumb ideas of all time."

Go deeper: Cuomo tears into McConnell for suggesting states should declare bankruptcy

Go deeper

Meadows: White House and Democrats are "nowhere close to a deal" on stimulus

Mnuchin and Meadows. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows told reporters after meeting with Democratic leaders on Wednesday that the two sides are "nowhere close to a deal" on a coronavirus stimulus bill, acknowledging that extra unemployment benefits will expire on Friday.

Why it matters: More than 32 million Americans are currently receiving some form of unemployment benefits, according to the most recent Labor Department data. Democrats had hoped to extend the $600 weekly supplemental unemployment benefit passed in the $2.2 trillion CARES Act, but the Senate GOP remains extremely divided.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 53 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.