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People in line outside a food pantry in Brooklyn, New York, in November 2020. Photo: Xinhua/Michael Nagle/Wang Ying via Getty Images

The Department of Labor said Tuesday that it does not expect people claiming certain federal unemployment benefits to experience a lapse in payments, despite President Trump's delay in signing the program extensions into law, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: It was previously expected that because Trump signed the legislation the day after benefits expired, the estimated 14 million people collecting Pandemic Unemployment Assistance and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation benefits would miss a week of payments.

  • But because the measure extends the programs without many new changes, it will be easier for states to implement the new legislation, a Labor Department spokesman said Tuesday, per Bloomberg.

Context: Trump blindsided lawmakers last week when he indicated that he would not sign the $900 billion coronavirus relief bill and $1.4 trillion government funding measure passed by Congress if it was not amended to increase stimulus payments.

Go deeper: Trump slams McConnell for blocking vote on $2,000 stimulus checks

Go deeper

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.