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Photo: Henrico County Police

A man accused of driving his pick-up truck into peaceful protesters in Richmond, Virginia, over the weekend is an "admitted leader of the Ku Klux Klan and a propagandist for Confederate ideology," prosecutors said Monday.

Details: Harry H. Rogers, 36, of Virginia, was charged with assault and battery, attempted malicious wounding, and felony vandalism over Sunday evening's incident, tweeted Shannon Taylor, the Commonwealth's Attorney for Henrico County. "We are investigating whether hate crimes charges are appropriate," she said in a statement.

  • Prosecutors allege that Rogers drove "recklessly" toward the Black Lives Matter protesters, revving up his truck's engine before driving into the crowd. He appeared in court on Monday morning and was denied bond, according to Richmond news outlet WTVR.

What they're saying: "Protesters acting peaceably, well within their constitutional rights of assembly, should not have to fear violence. We lived through this in Virginia in Charlottesville in 2017," Taylor said in the statement, referencing the white supremacist rally that killed antiracism activist Heather Heyer.

  • "I promise Henricoans that this egregious criminal act will not go unpunished. Hate has no place here under my watch."

Of note: In a separate incident on Sunday, a man drove a vehicle into a crowd of Black Lives Matter protesters on Seattle's Capitol Hill, shooting and injuring one man.

  • Nikolas Fernandez, 31, who is being held on investigation for first-degree assault, claims he acted in self-defense.

Go deeper

Oregon State Police deploying to Portland after fatal shooting

A Portland police officer guards the scene of a fatal shooting near a pro-Trump rally in Portland, Oregon, on Saturday. Photo: Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Oregon State Police will return to Portland to assist city officers following a fatal shooting during clashes between supporters of President Trump and Black Lives Matter protesters, Gov. Kate Brown (D) announced Sunday.

What's happening: Brown made the announcement in a statement outlining a six-point plan that she said would "protect free speech and bring violence and arson to an end in Portland," including the U.S. attorney and FBI committing more resources for the investigation of criminal activity.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
5 mins ago - Economy & Business

IPOs keep rolling despite stock market volatility

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Stock market volatility is supposed to be kryptonite for IPOs, causing issuers to hide out in their private market caves.

Yes, but: This is 2020, when nothing matters.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
44 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Higher education expands its climate push

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.