Aug 28, 2019

Kirsten Gillibrand drops out of the 2020 presidential race

Kirsten Gillibrand. Photo: Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images

2020 Democratic candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand told the New York Times in an interview Wednesday that she is withdrawing from the presidential race.

The big picture: Gillibrand attempted to brand herself as the women's candidate — focusing her campaign on reproductive rights, child care and her #MeToo advocacy. But with a relatively high number of women running, she struggled to stand out, leading to poor showing in the polls and a failure to qualify for next month's debates.

  • Gillibrand also joined the race with some baggage. Some Democrats remain upset with her for ousting former Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) for sexual misconduct without a hearing.
  • She previously had an "A"rating from the National Rifle Association and opposed amnesty for undocumented immigrants.

What she's saying:

“I think that women have a unique ability to bring people together and heal this country. I think a woman nominee would be inspiring and exciting. I will support whoever the nominee is, and I will do whatever it takes to beat Trump."

What's next: Gillibrand is not up for re-election in the Senate until 2024.

Go deeper: 2020 presidential election: Track which candidates are running

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These Senate seats are up for election in 2020

Photo: Getty Images

There are 36 Senate seats up for election in 2020 — including a special election in Arizona — many of which are expected to be brutally competitive as Democrats vie for control of the Senate.

Quick take: The Senate is currently made up of 53 Republicans, 45 Democrats and 2 independents who caucus with the Democrats. Dems must win 3 or 4 seats to take control of the Senate — 3 if the new vice president is a Democrat and 4 if not.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Aug 28, 2019

Tulsi Gabbard: DNC's Democratic debate selection process lacks transparency

Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard makes a speech during the Iowa State Fair on Aug. 9. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard told Fox News' "'Tucker Carlson Tonight" Wednesday that the Democratic National Committee's process for determining who qualifies in debates "lacks transparency."

"People deserve having that transparency, because, ultimately, it's the people who will decide who our Democratic nominee will be and ultimately who our next president, commander-in-chief will be.  And when you see that lack of transparency, it creates, you know, a lack of faith and trust in the process." 
Go deeperArrowAug 29, 2019

The 2020 candidates who have released their latest tax returns

Tom Steyer. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Personal financial disclosures have become a litmus test for Democratic 2020 hopefuls, as candidates link their tax disclosures with the long-standing fight to obtain President Trump’s tax returns.

Our thought bubble, per Axios' Alexi McCammond: It will likely be politically toxic for any 2020 Democrat not to release their tax returns, since this is an example of how anything they demand of Trump they must do themselves. This is Democrats’ way of separating themselves from Trump, trying to get back to norms and pushing for transparency.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Aug 29, 2019