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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Editor's Note: Gillibrand dropped out of contention for the Democratic presidential nomination on Aug. 28, 2019. Below is our original article on her candidacy.

Kirsten Gillibrand is a Democratic senator from New York known for her #MeToo advocacy and positions to protect sexual assault victims. Once a moderate congresswoman from a red district, she made a progressive turn after becoming senator.

Key facts:
  • Current position: New York senator — 10 years served
  • Age: 52
  • Born: Albany, New York
  • Undergraduate: Dartmouth
  • Date candidacy announced: March 17
  • % of votes in line with Trump, per FiveThirtyEight: 11.7% (lowest of any senator)
  • Previous roles: U.S. Representative (N.Y.-20), corporate attorney, 2000 Hillary Clinton Senate campaign
Stance on key issues:
Key criticisms:
  • Conservative track record: During her time as a member of the conservative Democrats Blue Dog Coalition when she represented New York's 20th district, Gillibrand had an 'A' rating from the NRA and opposed amnesty for undocumented immigrants.
  • Al Franken: Some Democrats remain upset that Gillibrand worked to oust Franken from the Senate without a hearing.
  • Staff sexual harassment: One of Gillibrand's staffers resigned over the handling of a sexual harassment complaint against an aides, showing her office to be at odds with her public persona as a champion of sexual harassment victims.
1 fun thing:

Per Politico, her former nickname was "Elbows" because of her "aggressive manner on the squash courts of Dartmouth."

Go deeper: Everything you need to know about the other 2020 candidates

Go deeper

Janet Yellen confirmed as Treasury secretary

Janet Yellen. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Senate voted 84-15 to confirm Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary on Monday.

Why it matters: Yellen is the first woman to serve as Treasury secretary, a Cabinet position that will be crucial in helping steer the country out of the pandemic-induced economic crisis.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.