Photo: Michael Tran/FilmMagic

At a meeting with Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump and others at the White House Wednesday, Kim Kardashian West talked about her recent visit to a women's prison, where she met a woman who had been given a life sentence at the age of 14 for killing someone as part of a gang initiation, Koch Industries general counsel and Freedom Partners chair Mark Holden, who attended the meeting, tells Axios.

The big picture: Kushner arranged the meeting as a follow-up to President Trump's invitation for people to suggest prisoners worthy of pardons. Kardashian West reached out to Kushner afterward to see if Trump was serious, a source familiar with the conversation tells Axios' Jonathan Swan.

More from the discussion, according to three sources at the meeting:

  • Advocates at the meeting discussed ways to "fix the broken clemency system" to ensure worthy candidates get a fair review, according to Cut50 cofounder Jessica Jackson.
  • They also talked about prison and re-entry reform. Kardashian West discussed how helpful in-prison therapy had been for the woman she talked to at the penitentiary. She agreed with other advocates that there should be increased incentives for people in prison to better themselves while there.

Between the lines: Some criminal justice reform advocates feel the Justice Department has too much control over which clemency candidates make it to the president's desk. They see it as a conflict of interest that the same agency which hands out sentences also oversees which prisoners deserve to be considered for clemency.

  • Shon Hopwood, an appellate lawyer and professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center who attended the meeting, pointed to Alice Marie Johnson as an example: "She had been denied three times by the Obama administration — why was that? Part of the reason is there is a conflict of interest within the DOJ."

Be smart: While Kushner seems to be looking for ways to improve the system and Kardashian West has proven to be a powerful advocate for the issue, Trump has been impulsive so far with his pardons.

Go deeper: "The Pardon Game": Trump's Celebrity Edition.

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Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. States: Nearly two dozen Minnesota COVID cases traced to 3 Trump campaign events
  6. World: Unrest in Italy as restrictions grow across Europe.
  7. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.
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In photos: Unrest in Italy as coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

An anti-government demonstration against the economic consequences of the new measures in Turin, Italy, where luxury stores were "ransacked," on Oct. 26, the Guardian reports. Photo: Diego Puletto/Getty Images

Protests in Italy against fresh COVID-19 pandemic restrictions that came into effect Monday descended into violence in Milan and and Turin, where police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, per the Guardian.

The big picture: The protests in Italian cities still reeling from the first lockdown mark some of the biggest resistance against measures seen yet as restrictions return across Europe, which is facing a second coronavirus wave. From Denmark to Romania, this is what's been happening, in photos.

Republicans and Dems react to Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation

President Trump stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett after she took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice during a White House ceremony Monday night .Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Trump said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court and her subsequent taking of the constitutional oath Monday was a "momentous day," as she she vowed to serve "without any fear or favour."

  • But as Republicans applauded the third conservative justice in four years, many Democrats including Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) warned of consequences to the rush to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ahead of the Nov. 3 election, with progressives leading calls to expand the court.