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Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin and President Trump. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Trump administration's health care agenda appeared likely to lose one of its closest allies last night as Democrat Andy Beshear declared victory over Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin.

Driving the news: Beshear has pledged to reverse Kentucky's plan for Medicaid work requirements — which took a backseat to national issues in the campaign, but was nevertheless one of Bevin's most significant policy legacies.

  • Not only did Bevin approve of the state's work requirements, he sued his own constituents to defend the policy, and threatened to pull out of the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion altogether if work requirements were ultimately struck down.
  • And a legal loss seems like a relatively likely outcome as the policy works its way through the courts.
  • By Bevin's own estimates, Kentucky's work rules would have shed about 95,000 people from the state's Medicaid rolls. Those coverage losses are a big part of the reason the policy has faced such resistance in the courts.

What's next: Bevin had not conceded at the time we hit "send" on this email, so things could change.

  • This won't be the end of litigation over Medicaid work requirements, but Kentucky wouldn't be the first state to reverse course after an election.
  • And as political losses and adverse court rulings add up, this signature of the Trump health agenda gets weaker.

Go deeper: Behind the scenes of Matt Bevin's loss in Kentucky's governor's race

Go deeper

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.