Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin and President Trump. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Trump administration's health care agenda appeared likely to lose one of its closest allies last night as Democrat Andy Beshear declared victory over Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin.

Driving the news: Beshear has pledged to reverse Kentucky's plan for Medicaid work requirements — which took a backseat to national issues in the campaign, but was nevertheless one of Bevin's most significant policy legacies.

  • Not only did Bevin approve of the state's work requirements, he sued his own constituents to defend the policy, and threatened to pull out of the Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion altogether if work requirements were ultimately struck down.
  • And a legal loss seems like a relatively likely outcome as the policy works its way through the courts.
  • By Bevin's own estimates, Kentucky's work rules would have shed about 95,000 people from the state's Medicaid rolls. Those coverage losses are a big part of the reason the policy has faced such resistance in the courts.

What's next: Bevin had not conceded at the time we hit "send" on this email, so things could change.

  • This won't be the end of litigation over Medicaid work requirements, but Kentucky wouldn't be the first state to reverse course after an election.
  • And as political losses and adverse court rulings add up, this signature of the Trump health agenda gets weaker.

Go deeper: Behind the scenes of Matt Bevin's loss in Kentucky's governor's race

Go deeper

Updated 51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 30,557,899 — Total deaths: 952,981— Total recoveries: 20,822,644Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 6,730,304 — Total deaths: 198,679 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 93,150,052Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19 — Massive USPS face mask operation called off — How the American diet worsens COVID-19.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety net.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.
  7. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19.

Trump says Republicans have an "obligation" to fill Ginsburg's seat

President Trump. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

President Trump wrote in a tweet Saturday morning that Republicans have an "obligation" to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court following her death Friday.

What he's saying: "We were put in this position of power and importance to make decisions for the people who so proudly elected us, the most important of which has long been considered to be the selection of United States Supreme Court Justices," the president said, tagging the Republican Party. "We have this obligation, without delay!"

Hundreds gather to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg along Supreme Court steps

Photo: Alex Brandon/AP

At the Supreme Court steps Friday night hundreds of people gathered to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — singing in a candlelight vigil, with some in tears.

Details: If there is a singular mood at the Supreme Court tonight, it’s some kind of a daze manifested by silence.