Of all the policies the Health and Human Services Department has actually finalized under President Trump, it's hard to think of a more significant rightward turn than the approval of Medicaid work requirements.

Driving the news: Judge James Boasberg is still not having it. He ruled against Kentucky's work requirements yesterday for the second time, citing many of the same reasons from his first opinion — namely, that HHS is not living up to Medicaid's legally defined purpose as a health care program.

  • He noted Kentucky and HHS' acknowledgements that fewer people will have Medicaid coverage as a result of these rules, and also criticized Gov. Matt Bevin for threatening to pull out of the expansion entirely if HHS loses this lawsuit.
  • "The Court cannot concur that the Medicaid Act leaves the Secretary so unconstrained, nor that the states are so armed to refashion the program Congress designed in any way they choose," Boasberg wrote.

Arkansas didn't fare much better, though that case is still earlier in the process than Kentucky's.

  • Boasberg began his Arkansas opinion with the story of a resident who does work, but didn't know he needed to report his compliance with the state's work requirements every month, and therefore lost his Medicaid coverage, got sick, and lost his job.
  • That's a clear sign, the ruling argues, that HHS didn't give sufficient weight to work requirements' burden on Medicaid's objectives as a source of health coverage.

What's next: New Hampshire's work requirements are also being challenged in court.

Go deeper: Medicaid work requirements aren't boosting work in Arkansas

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Trump's new TikTok threat

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump said twice Monday that the U.S. Treasury would need to get a portion of the sale price of TikTok, as a condition of regulatory approval.

Why it matters: This is akin to extortion — the sort of thing you'd expect to hear on a wiretap, not from the White House in front of reporters.

Ford names James Farley as new CEO amid ongoing turnaround effort

James Hackett, left, is retiring as Ford CEO. Jim Farley, right, takes over Oct. 1. Photo: Ford

Ford announced Tuesday that James Farley will take over as its next CEO, replacing James Hackett, 65, who is retiring after three years in the job.

Why it matters: It leaves Farley to complete the company's ongoing turnaround effort. The transition will be that much harder as the industry tries to navigate the coronavirus-induced economic slowdown which shuttered Ford plants for two months on the eve of some of its most important vehicle launches.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Watch the full "Axios on HBO" interview with President Trump

In this episode of “Axios on HBO”, President Trump discusses his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming election and much more with National Political Correspondent Jonathan Swan.

The interview was filmed on Tuesday, July 28 and aired Monday, Aug. 3 on HBO.