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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris doubled down on her call for Twitter to suspend President Trump's account for his combative tweets Tuesday, urging Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to act after Trump described the impeachment inquiry as a "coup."

What she's saying: Harris' latest comments build on her remarks on "Anderson Cooper 360" Monday night during which she said that Twitter should suspend Trump's account because of his attacks on lawmakers and the whistleblower.

Our thought bubble, per Axios technology editor Scott Rosenberg: Twitter is unlikely to suspend Trump's account. Its rules bar targeted harassment and threats of violence against individuals or groups, but the social media platform has long held that it will move with extra caution when it comes to public figures who may be considered a topic of legitimate public interest.

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Editor's note: This article has been updated with Harris' alert to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey.

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Big Tech marshals a right-leaning army of allies for antitrust fight

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As tech's giants prepare to face off with antitrust enforcers this summer, they will draw support from an array of predominantly right-leaning defenders ranging from influential former government officials to well-connected think tanks.

The big picture: The Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission and the states have multiple investigations of monopolistic behavior underway targeting Facebook and Google, with other giants like Amazon and Apple also facing rising scrutiny. Many observers expect a lawsuit against Google to land this summer.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is not the revolutionary that conservative activists want him to be.

He moves slower than they want, sides with liberals more than they want, and trims his sails in ways they find maddening. But he is still deeply and unmistakably conservative, pulling the law to the right — at his own pace and in his own image.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

By letting the coronavirus surge through the population with only minimal social distancing measures in place, the U.S. has accidentally become the world’s largest experiment in herd immunity.

Why it matters: Letting the virus spread while minimizing human loss is doable, in theory. But it requires very strict protections for vulnerable people, almost none of which the U.S. has established.