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Vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) will participate in Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation hearing virtually, the vice presidential nominee's communications director Chris Harris tweeted Sunday.

What they're saying: Harris won't attend the hearings in person because of Judiciary Republicans' "refusal to take commonsense steps to protect members, aides, Capitol complex workers, and members of the media," Chris Harris wrote.

  • Two members of the committee — Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) revealed they tested positive for the virus last week, after they attended a White House event to celebrate Barrett's nomination.
  • Kamala Harris tweeted Sunday: "By moving forward with Supreme Court confirmation hearings tomorrow—less than 2 weeks after members tested positive—Chairman Graham and Senate Republicans are endangering the lives of not just members and our staff, but the hardworking people who keep the Senate complex running."

Go deeper

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden Cabinet confirmation schedule: When to watch hearings

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Jan. 16 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Hearings for President Biden's Cabinet nominations to lead the Departments of Transportation, Commerce, Energy, and Veterans' Affairs started Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's been a slow start for a process that usually takes place days or weeks earlier for new and incoming presidents.

Jan 17, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Republicans ignore McCarthy and name-drop anyway

Rep. Liz Cheney speaks as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy watches. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

Members of the House Republican Conference ignored leader Kevin McCarthy last week when he warned them against criticizing colleagues by name based on intelligence that doing so could trigger more political violence.

Why it matters: McCarthy made clear that name-dropping opponents, instead of spelling out complaints in more general terms, can put a literal target on a politician, especially with tensions so high following the events of Jan. 6.

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