Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Former presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris endorsed Joe Biden for president on Sunday, saying in a tweet that he "has served our country with dignity and we need him now more than ever."

Why it matters: It's yet another endorsement of Biden from a former presidential candidate and an especially significant one considering that Harris' attacks on Biden over his support for busing in the first Democratic debate were viewed at the time as a massive blow.

  • Harris said during the opening debate that she doesn't believe Biden is a racist, but skewered him for speaking fondly about his time working with segregationist senators.
  • "There was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day," Harris famously said. "That little girl was me."
  • The viral moment led to a surge for Harris in the polls and a dip for Biden, who fumbled his response and seemed ill-prepared for the debate. In the end, however, it was Harris who dropped out in December and Biden who is now on pace to win the nomination.

What she's saying:

"One of the things that we need right now is we need a leader who really does care about the people and who can therefore unify the people. And I believe Joe can do that. I am supporting Joe because I believe that he is a man who has lived his life with great dignity. He is a public servant who has always worked for the best of who we are as a nation, and we need that right now. There is so much at stake in this election, guys."
— Kamala Harris

The big picture: Biden has received endorsements from at least nine former candidates as the moderate wing of the Democratic party has consolidated around him, including Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke and Mike Bloomberg.

  • Bernie Sanders has so far gained endorsements from former candidates Marianne Williamson and Bill de Blasio.

Of note: Harris, who is viewed as a possible pick for vice president, said she will appear with Biden at a rally in Detroit on March 9, one day before Michigan's Democratic primary.

  • A win for Biden in Michigan would likely be a knockout blow to his rival Sen. Bernie Sanders.

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