If President Trump watches "Fox & Friends" Wednesday, he'll see a new ad featuring Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro talking directly to him and blaming him for the El Paso mass shooting.

Why it matters: The ad is a way for Castro to show voters he's not afraid to directly take on Trump.

  • "Julián isn't afraid of Donald Trump or his bigoted agenda, and will continue to expose his racism and division until he defeats him next November," Maya Rupert, Castro's campaign manager, said in a statement.
  • If Trump responds to the ad on Twitter, it could also help Castro's campaign with exposure and fundraising.

The state of play: Castro is placing a small ad buy — just $2,775 — for three spots throughout the day on Fox News in Bedminster, N.J., where Trump is spending the week at his private golf club.

  • Castro's campaign will continue spreading the ad digitally after it airs.

Between the lines: The El Paso shooter wrote a manifesto that echoed Trump's rhetoric on Hispanics, taking issue with what he called a "Hispanic invasion" in the U.S.

  • In the ad, Castro says: "As we saw in El Paso, Americans were killed because you stoked the fire of racists. Innocent people were shot down because they look different from you. Because they look like me. They look like my family."

Go deeper: Julián Castro on the issues, in under 500 words

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 19,412,292 — Total deaths: 722,066 — Total recoveries — 11,773,112Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 4,945,795 — Total deaths: 161,456 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Politics: Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.
2 hours ago - Health

Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A growing body of research has made it clear that airborne transmission of the coronavirus is possible.

Why it matters: That fact means indoor spaces can become hot spots. Those spaces also happen to be where most business and schooling takes place, so any hope for a return to normality will require better ways of filtering indoor air.

The silver linings of online school

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Online learning can be frustrating for students, teachers and parents, but some methods are working.

The big picture: Just as companies are using this era of telework to try new things, some principals, teachers and education startups are treating remote learning as a period of experimentation, too.