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Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson has begun phase 3 trials in the U.S. for its one-shot coronavirus vaccine, with plans to enroll the most participants of any trial yet.

The big picture: Johnson & Johnson's vaccine has several advantages over its competitors that make it a promising option for mass distribution: The company is initially testing it as one dose and it does not have to be frozen for storage.

  • The Johnson & Johnson phase 3 trials will enroll 60,000 participants.

Between the lines: There's an increased scrutiny on the safety of any coronavirus vaccine that comes to market, and the FDA is planning on toughening the requirements for emergency authorization.

  • “With a larger trial, it also increases the safety data set,” said Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, according to the Washington Post. “Safety has been a lot in the public eye, and increasing the size of trials increases the safety data set as well.”
  • It is the 4th vaccine in the U.S. to enter Phase 3.

Go deeper

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
Oct 29, 2020 - Health

U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record

Expand chart
Data: COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

The United States reported 88,452 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, setting a single-day record, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

The big picture: The country confirmed 1,049 additional deaths due to the virus, and there are over 46,000 people currently being hospitalized, suggesting the U.S. is experiencing a third wave heading into the winter months.

Oct 30, 2020 - Health

Coronavirus surge threatens to shut classrooms down again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The nationwide surge in coronavirus cases is forcing many school districts to pull back from in-person instruction.

Why it matters: Remote learning is a burden on parents, teachers and students. But the wave of new infections, and its strain on some hospitals' capacity, makes all forms of reopening harder to justify.