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Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump defended his daughter Ivanka today following a Washington Post report that she used a personal account to send hundreds of emails to White House aides in a potential violation of federal records rules.

"They weren’t classified like Hillary Clinton. They weren't deleted like Hillary Clinton, who deleted 33,000. She wasn't doing anything to hide her emails."
— Trump to reporters before departing for Mar-a-Lago

Trump also defended his decision to issue a statement of support for Saudi Arabia despite the murder of journalist Jamal Khoshoggi. “We're not going to give up hundreds of billions of dollars of orders,” he said.

  • Despite boasting of lucrative deals with Saudis in the past, Trump said he had no personal interest in Saudi Arabia: “I don't get money from Saudi Arabia. ... I couldn't care less. They buy hundreds of billions of dollars of things from this country. ... They will get the military equipment and other things from Russia and China."

Trump said that he could "easily" get around the new restraining order imposed on his asylum ban by a federal court.

  • He said he would be filing a "major complaint," and went on to criticize left-leaning courts who have held up many of his efforts to cut back on immigration.
  • "People should not be allowed to immediately run to this very friendly circuit and file their case," he said.

More from his remarks ...

  • Mueller's questions: Trump confirmed that he has finished answering Special Counsel Robert Mueller's questions, and that his written answers are in the hands of his lawyers.
  • He predicted that Cindy Hyde-Smith would win the Mississippi Senate runoff against Mike Espy, saying that her comment about going to a public hanging was a joke and that she "feels bad" about it.
  • War zone: Trump was asked if he was afraid to go to a war zone such as Afghanistan, according to the pool report, to which he replied, “No, I'm going to a war zone.”
  • Person of the Year: When asked who he thought we get Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" title, Trump said, "I've been there before. I can't imagine anybody else other than Trump. Can you imagine anybody other than Trump?”

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.