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Khashoggi in 2014. Photo: Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty Images

Eight months before he disappeared after entering a Saudi consulate in Istanbul, journalist Jamal Khashoggi described Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) as an ultra-ambitious ruler with a tendency to "shoot first, aim later."

Why it matters: Khashoggi relocated to the U.S. because his criticism of MBS had made life too dangerous in his native Saudi Arabia. Now, U.S. intelligence reportedly believes MBS is responsible for his death. An Altamar podcast interview reveals him to be conflicted about the 33-year-old prince, whom he compared to England’s Henry VIII. "I like some of the things he’s doing," Khashoggi said, "but I feel that he is doing it the wrong way."

Key quotes
  • "Saudi Arabia needed someone like Mohammed bin Salman. It was going through stagnation, it was moving slowly, we need to realize how difficult the world is becoming around it. So somebody had to come and seize the moment."
  • "I think he wants to see himself as the second founder of Saudi Arabia, inheriting the legacy not of his father but rather of his grandfather who founded the kingdom 100 years ago. … As a Saudi citizen, I would really like to see him as a reformist, as somebody who will provide jobs for young Saudis and turn the Saudi economy into a true economy. But also he is seen as repressive, so it is quite confusing. I have mixed feelings about him."
  • "Sometimes I feel his style is shoot first, aim later. He needs proper advisers around him to lead Saudi Arabia into the future. But he does believe in himself, it’s obvious, he very much believes in himself."

The bottom line: "If I was a historian I would see Mohammed bin Salman as somebody who is putting Saudi Arabia on a fast-forward mood. Many of the things he is doing, probably he doesn’t foresee how the country will be in ten years time. It is similar to what Henry VIII did when he separated the Church of England from Rome. Maybe he did that only to get divorced, but he changed the discourse and the history of England forever."

Go deeper: Listen to the full interview.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

World leaders react to "new dawn in America" under Biden administration

President Biden reacts delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

World leaders have pledged to work with President Biden on issues including the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, with many praising his move to begin the formal process for the U.S. to rejoin the Paris Climate Agreement.

The big picture: Several leaders noted the swift shift from former President Trump's "America First" policy to Biden's action to re-engage with the world and rebuild alliances.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with first lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

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