May 12, 2018

Iran's world tour to save the nuclear deal

Zarif. Photo: John Thys/AFP via Getty Images

Iran's foreign minister, Mohammed Javad Zarif, is embarking on a tour of Europe, China and Russia in an effort to save the Iran nuclear deal, Reuters reports.

The bottom line: After the U.S. withdrew from the deal and announced forthcoming sanctions against companies and countries that do business with Iran, the Middle Eastern country must try to safeguard its trade relationships for the sake of its economy.

Yes, but: While China and Russia are well-positioned to evade U.S. sanctions, the European Union is not. If forced to choose between the $400 billion per year Iranian market and the $18 trillion per year U.S. market, Europe will pick the U.S.

Zarif's stops: He heads to Beijing today, then Russia, then Brussels to meet his counterparts from France, the U.K. and Germany.

Go deeper: The companies hit hardest by sanctions on Iran

Go deeper

Private equity returns fell behind stocks over the past decade

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. private equity returns fell just below S&P 500 returns for the 10-year period ending last June, according to a report released Monday morning by Bain & Company.

Why it matters: Private equity markets itself as beating public markets over long-term time horizons, and usually providing an illiquidity premium to boot. These new performance figures not only dent such claims, but provide fresh ammunition to critics of public pension investment in private equity funds.

Why Apple may move to open iOS

Photo illustration: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apple may finally allow iPhone owners to set email or browsing apps other than Apple's own as their preferred defaults, according to a Bloomberg report from last week.

The big picture: Customers have long clamored for the ability to choose their preferred apps, and now Apple, like other big tech companies, finds itself under increased scrutiny over anything perceived as anticompetitive.