Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the Capitol on Jan. 8. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Wednesday that the House will vote tomorrow on a War Powers Resolution to curb potential military action by President Trump toward Iran.

Driving the news: Members of Congress were briefed Wednesday by top national security officials on the intelligence behind the decision to kill Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani. Nothing Trump officials told the House in Wednesday's classified briefing apparently persuaded Democratic leadership against moving forward with the vote on the resolution on Thursday.

The big picture: Democrats and some Republicans have criticized the administration for not obtaining congressional approval before killing one of Iran's most powerful officials. Democrats specifically have questioned claims that there was an "imminent" threat posed by Soleimani, with many stating after Wednesday's briefing that nothing that officials presented them with alleviated their concerns.

What they're saying:

  • Sens. Mike Lee (R-Utah) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) said that they would back a War Powers Resolution brought by Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) in the Senate, with a frustrated Lee calling it the "worst briefing” he's been to and blasting officials for instructing senators not to debate the strike on Soleimani.
  • House Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) told reporters: "The position of the administration is that there was an imminent threat, that Solemani was planning things. I think the storming of our embassy was a wake-up call to the administration. Am I convinced of it? I'm not so sure."
  • Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Ill.) told Axios' Alayna Treene: "Nothing I heard, at any point, makes me think that there was something more imminent. Iran is a danger. Iran is a threat. It's the leading exporter of terrorism in the world. So obviously we're very concerned, but you have to have a strategy, not just military escalation, and it has to be in conjunction with our allies. And clearly that's not the case."
  • Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) told Treene: "What has been said publicly by Mike Pompeo was reiterated and truly shocked everyone, that the president is using Article two and the AUMF from 2002, which was an effort to go after Iraq and after Saddam Hussein. A basis on which he could not have taken the action he did."

Context: The AUMF (Authorization for Use of Military Force) gave the president the authority to use "all necessary and appropriate force" against anyone believed to have been involved or aided the Sept. 11 attacks.

The other side: Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said Trump's national security officials "answered every important question," arguing on Twitter that "anyone who walks out & says they aren't convinced action against #Soleimani was justified is either never going to be convinced or just oppose everything Trump does."

  • Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), one of Trump's most loyal defenders on the Hill, said the briefing "should leave little doubt in any member’s mind that not only did the president make the right call, but that this was a clear and present danger for American interests and American individuals,” per the Washington Post.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
48 mins ago - Sports

College basketball is back

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A new season of college basketball begins Wednesday, and the goal is clear: March Madness must be played.

Why it matters: On March 12, 2020, the lights went out on college basketball, depriving teams like Baylor (who won our tournament simulation), Dayton, San Diego State and Florida State of perhaps their best chance to win a national championship.

54 mins ago - World

Scoop: Israeli military prepares for possibility Trump will strike Iran

Defense Minister Benny Gantz attends a cabinet meeting. Photo: Abir Sultan/POOL/AFP via Getty

The Israel Defense Forces have in recent weeks been instructed to prepare for the possibility that the U.S. will conduct a military strike against Iran before President Trump leaves office, senior Israeli officials tell me.

Why it matters: The Israeli government instructed the IDF to undertake the preparations not because of any intelligence or assessment that Trump will order such a strike, but because senior Israeli officials anticipate “a very sensitive period” ahead of Biden's inauguration on Jan. 20.

Wall Street bets it all on a vaccine

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

It's the time of year when Wall Street shops are rolling out predictions for where they see the stock market headed in the coming year. There's one common theme: Widespread distribution of a vaccine is the reason to be bullish.

Why it matters: Analysts say vaccines will help the economy heal, corporate profits rebound and stock market continue its upward trajectory.