Nov 18, 2019

International college student enrollment falls for third consecutive year

George Washington University students. Photo: Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A new Institute of International Education report shows that the number of international students newly enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities fell by 1% last academic year, per AP.

Why it matters: The drop marks the third consecutive year that enrollment for international students dipped, following 7% and 3% decreases in the two previous years, which were the first downturns in more than a decade.

  • Downturns in international enrollment can disrupt universities' budgets, many of which rely on tuition from foreign students who typically pay higher tuition rates than U.S. students.

What they're saying: Caroline Casagrande, deputy assistant secretary for academic programs at the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, told AP that international students are deterred by the high tuition costs at U.S. universities.

  • Meanwhile, some universities say the Trump administration's immigration rhetoric and the U.S.-China trade war has turned international students away.

Details: Students from China continue to attend U.S. universities more than any other country, followed by students from India, South Korea and Saudi Arabia.

Yes, but: While fewer new students are enrolling, more international graduates are staying for professional training and work. In 2018, more than 220,000 graduates were granted permission to stay for temporary work through federal programs after graduation, an increase of about 10% over 2017.

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Virginia governor announces removal of Richmond's Robert E. Lee statue

Photo: Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced on Thursday that the state will remove the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from Richmond's historic Monument Avenue.

Why it matters: It's a watershed moment for Virginia, which has been at the center of a years-long national debate about whether Confederate monuments should be displayed publicly. That discussion reached a boiling point when protests about a statue of Lee in Charlottesville turned violent in 2017.

RNC expands convention search across the Sun Belt

Donald Trump, Mike Pence and their families on the last night of the Republican National Convention in Ohio in 2016. Photo: David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images.

The Republican National Committee is planning site visits over the next 10 days to more than a half-dozen cities — across the South and into Texas and Arizona — as it scrambles for a new convention host, people familiar with the internal discussions tell Axios.

Driving the news: The RNC's executive committee voted Wednesday night to allow most of the convention to move — with only a smaller, official portion remaining in Charlotte — after North Carolina's governor said the coronavirus pandemic would mean a scaled-back event with social distancing and face coverings.

Oil faces tough road back from coronavirus

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Oil companies in the battered shale patch are starting to bring back some production as prices climb, but a new report underscores how the pandemic is taking a heavy financial toll despite signs of revival.

Driving the news: Fourteen North American producers have filed for bankruptcy thus far during the second quarter, per a tally from the law firm Haynes and Boone, which closely tracks the sector's finances.