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Photo: Marina Lystseva\TASS via Getty Images

The coronavirus outbreak could cost airlines up to $113 billion in lost revenue from declines in air travel in the spring and early summer, the International Air Transport Association said Thursday in a press release.

Why it matters: The IATA estimates that airlines could experience a 19% loss in passenger revenues if the virus extensively spreads in countries that now have 10 or more confirmed cases as of March 2.

  • IATA assumes that the industry will recover in late summer or early fall.
  • The IATA’s previous estimate in February put lost revenues at $29.3 billion based on a scenario in which the virus was confined to markets associated with China. Since that analysis, the virus has spread to more than 80 countries.

What they're saying: “The turn of events as a result of COVID-19 is almost without precedent," said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s director general and CEO. "In little over two months, the industry’s prospects in much of the world have taken a dramatic turn for the worse."

  • “Many airlines are cutting capacity and taking emergency measures to reduce costs. Governments must take note. Airlines are doing their best to stay afloat as they perform the vital task of linking the world’s economies," Juniac said.

The big picture: Airlines are benefitting from lower oil prices, but also have had to reduce operation costs by cutting jobs, asking employees to take unpaid leave and limiting flights, according to AP.

  • British regional airline Flybe announced Thursday that it would stop flying in part due to the virus' impact on air travel, the BBC reports.
  • Axios' Marisa Fernandez reports that British Airways announced Monday that it will begin limiting London-New York flights to match low demand.

Go deeper: Coronavirus to deliver largest decline in international travel to U.S. since financial crisis

Go deeper

Biden's Day 1 challenges: Systemic racism

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Kirsty O'Connor (PA Images)/Getty Images

Advocates are pushing President-elect Biden to tackle systemic racism with a Day 1 agenda that includes ending the detention of migrant children and expanding DACA, announcing a Justice Department investigation of rogue police departments and returning some public lands to Indigenous tribes.

Why it matters: Biden has said the fight against systemic racism will be one of the top goals of his presidency — but the expectations may be so high that he won't be able to meet them.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
46 mins ago - Health

Most Americans are still vulnerable to the coronavirus

Adapted from Bajema, et al., 2020, "Estimated SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in the US as of September 2020"; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As of September, the vast majority of Americans did not have coronavirus antibodies, according to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Why it matters: As the coronavirus spreads rapidly throughout most of the country, most people remain vulnerable to it.

Trump set to appear at Pennsylvania GOP hearing on voter fraud claims

President Trumpat the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump is due to join his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Wednesday at a Republican-led state Senate Majority Policy Committee hearing to discuss alleged election irregularities.

Why it matters: This would be his first trip outside of the DMV since Election Day and comes shortly after GSA ascertained the results, formally signing off on a transition to President-elect Biden.