British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

The U.K. said Tuesday that it will no longer allow Chinese tech company Huawei to access its 5G network amid growing pressure on Prime Minister Boris Johnson to take a stand against Beijing, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: It's a big win for the Trump administration, which has sought to firewall Huawei from networks around the world and put intense pressure on its closest ally to make such a move.

  • Huawei works closely with the Chinese government, arguably leaving the company's equipment susceptive to malign actors.
  • The U.K. already banned Huawei from accessing its core communications networks earlier this year.

What they're saying: "This has not been an easy decision, but it is the right one for the U.K.'s telecoms networks, for our national security and our economy, both now and indeed in the long run," Oliver Dowden, the U.K. government's telecom minister, told the House of Commons.

  • "This government is clear-eyed about China. ... What we want is a modern and mature relationship with China based on mutual respect," he added.

The other side: China contends that the U.S. is milking security concerns as a means to oust economic competition.

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