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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The U.K. may further restrict technology from Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, on its 5G networks, due to security concerns, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: The move is seen as a diplomatic victory for the U.S., which has sought to prevent Huawei technologies from being employed in communication networks across the world. China, meanwhile, accuses the U.S. of using security rationales to squeeze Huawei from international markets because it is hostile to economic competition.

  • The reported move by the U.K., which might ban new Huawei equipment from being used in U.K. networks by the end of the year, follows a gradual toughening of restrictions on Huawei there, though U.K. officials have generally taken a more conciliatory position toward the company than their U.S. counterparts.
  • Unlike the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand, for instance, the U.K. set up a special center, paid for by Huawei but overseen by members of GCHQ, the U.K.'s signals intelligence agency. The facility gives British intelligence officials access to Huawei software and hardware to inspect any unintended — or purposeful — vulnerabilities that might allow China to snoop digitally on other countries' networks.
  • In January, British officials banned Huawei technology from being used in its "core" communications networks, as well as those close to the military, intelligence, and nuclear sites.
  • The new reported restrictions further squeeze Huawei's ability to operate in the country — and are likely tantamount to a total ban.

Go deeper: FCC bars Huawei and ZTE from subsidies, citing national security

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Aug 17, 2020 - Technology

The great tech decoupling is here

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Longstanding threats from both the U.S. and China to claw apart the two countries' interdependent tech economies are finally giving way to reality.

Why it matters: A divorce is going to be messy, with lots of near-term pain on both sides. And the end result may be a diminished, more fractured world compared to the one that existed just a couple of years ago.

Updated 21 mins ago - World

Russia says it fired warning shots at British destroyer in Black Sea

The HMS Defender in the port of Odessa on Ukraine's Black Sea coast on June 18. Photo: Konstantin Sazonchik\TASS via Getty Images

Russia's defense ministry claimed Wednesday that a Russian warship and fighter jet fired "warning" shots at the British Royal Navy’s HMS Defender destroyer for encroaching on waters near Crimea in the Black Sea.

The latest: The U.K.'s ministry of defense disputed that any warning shots were fired, saying in a statement, "We believe the Russians were undertaking a gunnery exercise in the Black Sea and provided the maritime community with prior-warning of their activity."

Mike Allen, author of AM
Updated 45 mins ago - Politics & Policy

First look: WaPo Trump book's secret title revealed

Cover: Penguin Press

The Washington Post's Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker will be out July 20 with "I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year," Penguin Press announced.

Breaking: Axios has learned that The Wall Street Journal's Michael Bender is moving "Frankly, We Did Win the Election" up to July 20, matching Leonnig-Rucker, from his earlier pub date of Aug. 10.