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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Europe and the U.S. have seen a recent rise in anti-immigrant sentiment that has fueled policies seeking to keep out refugees and migrants.

Why it matters: As the number of displaced people worldwide continues to grow, the burden of caring for refugees is increasingly falling on developing nations. And resettlement to wealthier nations "is a solution that is genuinely and urgently needed by more people than there are places for them made available by governments," Chris Boian, spokesperson for UNHCR, told Axios. 

"There are actions and behaviors and border restrictions that are taking place around the world that would not be taking place around the world without the influence — and dare I say leadership — of the Trump administration."
— Eric Schwartz, president of Refugees International and former assistant secretary of state for population, refugees and migration, told Axios.
  • Americans are more likely to say they want fewer immigrants admitted to the U.S. than more, according to a new Pew Research survey.
  • But the sentiment is much more strongly seen in European countries — more than 70% of Italians, Greeks and Hungarians said they think their nations should allow fewer immigrants in.
  • In the U.S., President Trump has cut the refugee cap two years in a row. Just 22,000 refugees were admitted in fiscal year 2018, which ended Sept. 30 — the lowest number in more than 40 years.
  • The Trump administration also attempted to disqualify migrants from asylum if they crossed the border illegally, though those efforts were blocked in court.
  • Migrant and refugee arrivals have also dropped significantly in Europe. This week, the last rescue ship in the Mediterranean, Aquarius — which saved more than 30,000 lives — was forced to end operations after being denied access to Italian ports. In 2017 alone, more than 3,000 people died attempting to cross the Mediterranean.
"We just can't understand why saving lives has become illegal."
— MSF International president Joanne Liu

The signing of the UN’s first-ever global migration pact last week in Morocco illustrated the sharp political divide over the issue:

  • Belgium’s prime minister lost his parliamentary majority over his decision to sign it.
  • Germany’s Angela Merkel, whose government was brought to the verge of collapse earlier this year in a dispute over migration, spoke out in favor of the pact.
  • Austria, Italy, Hungary, Poland and Switzerland joined the U.S. in refusing to sign on.

What’s next: Next week the UN General Assembly will turn to the Global Compact for Refugees, which outlines ways the international community can best aide in the refugee crisis. Given what happened in Morocco, the U.S. is not expected to vote in favor of this compact.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 40 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases hold steady at 65,000 per day — CDC declares racism "a serious public health threat" — WHO official: Brazil is dealing with "raging inferno" of a COVID outbreak
  2. Vaccines: America may be close to hitting a vaccine wall — Pfizer asks FDA to expand COVID vaccine authorization to adolescents — CDC says Johnson & Johnson vaccine supply will drop 80% next week.
  3. Economy: Treasury says over 156 million stimulus payments sent out since March — More government spending expected as IMF projects 6% global GDP growth.
  4. Politics: Supreme Court ends California's coronavirus restrictions on home religious meetings
  5. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.

Second senior Matt Gaetz aide resigns amid federal investigation

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) walking out of the Capitol in January 2021. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Devin Murphy, Rep. Matt Gaetz's legislative director, has stepped down amid a federal investigation into sex trafficking allegations against the Florida Republican congressman, the New York Times first reported and Axios has confirmed.

The latest: "It's been real," Murphy wrote in an email, obtained by Axios, to Republican legislative directors on Saturday morning, with the subject line: "Well...bye."

Rep. Dan Crenshaw says he'll be blind for a month after eye surgery

Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-Texas) in Washington, D.C., in December 2020. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-Texas) said in a statement Saturday he will be blind for roughly a month after getting surgery to reattach the retina in left eye.

Why it matters: Crenshaw, who lost his right eye and sustained severe damage to his left eye during his third deployment to Afghanistan in 2012, said he will be "pretty much off the grid for the next few weeks."