Nov 18, 2019

House investigating whether Trump lied in written answers to Mueller

Robert Mueller testifiies. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The House is investigating whether President Trump lied in his written answers to special counsel Robert Mueller in the wake of new revelations from Roger Stone's trial, CNN reports.

Why it matters: House Democrats had previously suggested in a court filing in September that Trump may have lied, but they drew "new focus" to the allegations during opening arguments Monday in a case involving the Judiciary Committee's request to unseal grand jury materials from the Mueller report, per CNN.

  • Former Trump deputy campaign chairman Rick Gates testified in last week's trial that Roger Stone spoke with then-candidate Trump in a July 2016 phone call.
  • A minute after ending the call, Trump told Gates, in reference to WikiLeaks, that "more information would be coming."
  • Trump told Mueller in written answers included in the special counsel's report that he did not recall discussing WikiLeaks with Stone.

The big picture: According to the Washington Post, House general counsel Douglas Letter told the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Monday that the grand jury materials are necessary for the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

“Did the president lie? Was the president not truthful in his responses to the Mueller investigation? The House is trying to determine whether the current president should remain in office. This is unbelievably serious and it’s happening right now, very fast.”
— Douglas Letter

Go deeper: Six Trump associates convicted in Mueller-related investigations

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Deaths without consequences

Community organizations and activists demand police accountability at a rally in Grand Central Terminal to commemorate the 5-year anniversary of Mike Brown's death by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson. Photo: Erik McGregor/Getty Images

Seven years after the launch of the Black Lives Matter movement, it's still rare for police officers to be charged in the deaths of African Americans — and even more rare for an officer to go to jail.

The big picture: The Minneapolis police officer who was captured on video kneeling on George Floyd's neck has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter — which is already a step beyond the consequences other police officers have faced. But it's no guarantee that he will face jail time.

Teenager killed after shots fired at protesters in Detroit

Detroit police during protests on Friday night. Photo: Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images

A 19-year-old man was killed on Friday night after shots were fired into a crowd of demonstrators in downtown Detroit who were protesting the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, per AP.

Details: The teenager was injured when shots were fired from an SUV about 11:30 p.m. and later died in hospital, reports MDN reports, which noted police were still looking for a suspect. Police said officers were not involved in the shooting, according to AP.

Go deeper: In photos: Protesters clash with police nationwide over George Floyd

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: Protesters clash with police nationwide over George Floyd

Police officers grapple with protesters in Atlanta. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Police used tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd spread nationwide on Friday evening.

The big picture: Police responded in force in cities ranging from Atlanta to Des Moines, Houston to Detroit, Milwaukee to D.C. and Denver to Louisville. In Los Angeles, police declared a stretch of downtown off limits, with Oakland issuing a similar warning.