Nov 18, 2019

House investigating whether Trump lied in written answers to Mueller

Robert Mueller testifiies. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The House is investigating whether President Trump lied in his written answers to special counsel Robert Mueller in the wake of new revelations from Roger Stone's trial, CNN reports.

Why it matters: House Democrats had previously suggested in a court filing in September that Trump may have lied, but they drew "new focus" to the allegations during opening arguments Monday in a case involving the Judiciary Committee's request to unseal grand jury materials from the Mueller report, per CNN.

  • Former Trump deputy campaign chairman Rick Gates testified in last week's trial that Roger Stone spoke with then-candidate Trump in a July 2016 phone call.
  • A minute after ending the call, Trump told Gates, in reference to WikiLeaks, that "more information would be coming."
  • Trump told Mueller in written answers included in the special counsel's report that he did not recall discussing WikiLeaks with Stone.

The big picture: According to the Washington Post, House general counsel Douglas Letter told the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Monday that the grand jury materials are necessary for the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

“Did the president lie? Was the president not truthful in his responses to the Mueller investigation? The House is trying to determine whether the current president should remain in office. This is unbelievably serious and it’s happening right now, very fast.”
— Douglas Letter

Go deeper: Six Trump associates convicted in Mueller-related investigations

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Schiff: Uncontested facts from inquiry show Trump solicited a bribe

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff holds a press conference in the Capitol on Tuesday. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) told NPR Tuesday the impeachment inquiry draft report provides "abundant evidence" that President Trump's acts on Ukraine would qualify him to be impeached.

What's new: Schiff told CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360" later Tuesday that evidence suggests Trump was "using" Rudy Giuliani to "coerce Ukraine" in that probe. Schiff said investigators are trying to find the owner of a "-1" number that featured in call records involving Giuliani and his Ukraine work. He said there were "indications in the trial of Roger Stone that when he was communicating with the president."

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 4, 2019

Roger Stone arrived with a Bible, left with a conviction

Roger Stone and his wife Nydia Stone arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse, on Nov. 15 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone held a Bible as he arrived at the federal courthouse in Washington on Friday.

The intrigue: Hours later, the self-proclaimed "dirty trickster" was convicted on all charges — guilty of seven counts of lying to Congress, obstruction and witness tampering, Reuters reports.

Go deeperArrowNov 16, 2019

House Judiciary Committee announces first impeachment hearing

Jerry Nadler. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee announced Tuesday that it will hold a hearing on Dec. 4 to discuss the "historical and constitutional basis of impeachment" and the definition of an impeachable offense.

The big picture: The committee, led by Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) is expected to receive a report on the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into President Trump's dealings with Ukraine shortly after Thanksgiving and will ultimately be responsible for recommending articles of impeachment to be voted on by the full House. Nadler sent a letter to Trump on Tuesday inviting him and his attorneys to participate in the hearing.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019