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Adam Schiff. Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee are considering a number of possible measures to protect the identity of the Ukraine whistleblower during their upcoming testimony, fearing possible reprisal from President Trump's allies in Congress, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Trump has repeatedly sought to undermine the credibility of the whistleblower whose allegations have helped set off an impeachment inquiry, suggesting on numerous occasions that the whistleblower is sort of a "spy" or partisan actor and claiming that he deserves to "meet" his accuser.

  • The whistleblower's attorney Andrew Bakaj tweeted last month that his client is "entitled to anonymity. Law and policy support this and the individual is not to be retaliated against. Doing so is a violation of federal law."
  • Bakaj also wrote to the chairs of the House and Senate Intelligence committees and the acting director of national intelligence about "serious concerns we have regarding our client's safety."

Details: Democrats on the committee have discussed holding the testimony at a remote location away from Capitol Hill, as well as the possibility of a "staff-only session" without members of Congress, per the Post.

  • Other potential measures reportedly include having the whistleblower testify via a video feed that would obscure their face and voice, sit behind a "screen or partition," or offer an audio-only testimony.

The bottom line: The extreme steps being considered underscore how bitterly divided and partisan the House Intelligence Committee — which has been tasked by Speaker Nancy Pelosi with leading the impeachment inquiry — has become.

Go deeper: Trump demands to meet whistleblower and accuses Adam Schiff of "treason"

Go deeper

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.