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Attorney General Bill Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn. Photos: Getty Images

The House is expected to vote on June 11 on whether to hold Attorney General Bill Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn in contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with subpoenas, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Monday.

"The resolution will authorize the Judiciary Committee to pursue civil action to seek enforcement of its subpoenas in federal court. It also authorizes House Committees that have issued subpoenas as part of their oversight and investigation responsibilities to seek civil enforcement of those subpoenas when they are ignored."

The big picture: The House Judiciary Committee authorized a contempt citation for Barr along party lines on May 8 for missing a deadline to turn over the full, unredacted Mueller report. Earlier Monday, the House Oversight Committee announced it would schedule a contempt vote for Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross for an entirely different matter — the administration's refusal to cooperate with House Democrats' investigation into the Census citizenship question.

  • Top Democratic officials have hinted that they may package together a series of contempt citations for Trump officials in a single vote. Barr and McGahn will both be included, but it's unclear whether other officials who have rejected subpoenas — such as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross — will be cited as well.
  • Assuming the contempt votes pass, House Democrats will take the officials to court in an effort to enforce the subpoenas.

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Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies.

The state of play: Biden also raised arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to a White House readout. The statement said Biden and Putin agreed maintain "consistent communication," and that Biden stressed the U.S. would "act firmly in defense of its national interests in response to actions by Russia that harm us or our allies."

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.