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A statue of Alexander Hamilton Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy, on display in in Statuary Hall inside the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House voted 305-113 on Wednesday to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol building.

Why it matters: The bipartisan vote comes amid a broader national movement to eliminate symbols of racism and oppression that has led to the removal of Confederate statues across the country.

Details: Wednesday's bill would require states to reclaim and replace statues given to the U.S. Capitol's National Statuary Hall that depict Americans who defended the Confederacy, slavery or white supremacy.

  • At least 11 statues of Confederate leaders and generals are currently in that collection, including a monument of Alexander Hamilton Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy.
  • The bill would also replace a bust of former Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, who authored the Dred Scott decision in 1857, stating that Black Americans could not be U.S. citizens.
  • A statue of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American Supreme Court justice, would replace Taney's bust, which is inside the Old Supreme Court Chamber.

What they're saying: "My ancestors built the Capitol, but yet there are monuments to the very people that enslaved my ancestors," Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), said Wednesday, according to CNN.

What's next: It is unclear whether the GOP-controlled Senate will take up the bill. Republicans have previously blocked similar legislation in the Senate.

  • It is also unknown how President Trump will react to the legislation. He has criticized efforts from Congress and the Pentagon to remove Confederate imagery and namesakes from military installations.

Go deeper: Trump says he's not offended by the Confederate flag

Go deeper

Oct 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Senate confirms Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett before a meeting on Capitol Hill on Oct. 21. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. She is expected to be sworn in within hours.

Why it matters: President Trump and Senate Republicans have succeeded in confirming a third conservative justice in just four years, tilting the balance of the Supreme Court firmly to the right for perhaps a generation.

Updated 33 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases hold steady at 65,000 per day — CDC declares racism "a serious public health threat" — WHO official: Brazil is dealing with "raging inferno" of a COVID outbreak
  2. Vaccines: America may be close to hitting a vaccine wall — Pfizer asks FDA to expand COVID vaccine authorization to adolescents — CDC says Johnson & Johnson vaccine supply will drop 80% next week.
  3. Economy: Treasury says over 156 million stimulus payments sent out since March — More government spending expected as IMF projects 6% global GDP growth.
  4. Politics: Supreme Court ends California's coronavirus restrictions on home religious meetings
  5. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.

Second senior Matt Gaetz aide resigns amid federal investigation

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) walking out of the Capitol in January 2021. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Devin Murphy, Rep. Matt Gaetz's legislative director, has stepped down amid a federal investigation into sex trafficking allegations against the Florida Republican congressman, the New York Times first reported and Axios has confirmed.

The latest: "It's been real," Murphy wrote in an email, obtained by Axios, to Republican legislative directors on Saturday morning, with the subject line: "Well...bye."