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A statue of Alexander Hamilton Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy, on display in in Statuary Hall inside the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House voted 305-113 on Wednesday to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol building.

Why it matters: The bipartisan vote comes amid a broader national movement to eliminate symbols of racism and oppression that has led to the removal of Confederate statues across the country.

Details: Wednesday's bill would require states to reclaim and replace statues given to the U.S. Capitol's National Statuary Hall that depict Americans who defended the Confederacy, slavery or white supremacy.

  • At least 11 statues of Confederate leaders and generals are currently in that collection, including a monument of Alexander Hamilton Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy.
  • The bill would also replace a bust of former Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, who authored the Dred Scott decision in 1857, stating that Black Americans could not be U.S. citizens.
  • A statue of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American Supreme Court justice, would replace Taney's bust, which is inside the Old Supreme Court Chamber.

What they're saying: "My ancestors built the Capitol, but yet there are monuments to the very people that enslaved my ancestors," Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), said Wednesday, according to CNN.

What's next: It is unclear whether the GOP-controlled Senate will take up the bill. Republicans have previously blocked similar legislation in the Senate.

  • It is also unknown how President Trump will react to the legislation. He has criticized efforts from Congress and the Pentagon to remove Confederate imagery and namesakes from military installations.

Go deeper: Trump says he's not offended by the Confederate flag

Go deeper

Oct 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Senate confirms Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett before a meeting on Capitol Hill on Oct. 21. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. She is expected to be sworn in within hours.

Why it matters: President Trump and Senate Republicans have succeeded in confirming a third conservative justice in just four years, tilting the balance of the Supreme Court firmly to the right for perhaps a generation.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.