Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As hospital prices rise and much of the sector continues to rake in cash, rural hospitals continue to shutter.

Why it matters: There's no way to address U.S. health care spending without cutting hospital costs. But blanket cuts could hurt hospitals that are already struggling to keep their doors open, leaving vulnerable patients without access to care.

Driving the news: At least 30 hospitals entered bankruptcy in 2019, Bloomberg reported last week.

  • Rural hospitals' hardships have been well-documented: They serve a shrinking population that has high health needs and is disproportionately uninsured or covered by government insurance.
  • The shutdown of an urban hospital in Philadelphia is evidence that it's not just rural areas that are facing hospital closures.

Yes, but: Some hospital systems are reaping in hefty profits.

  • In an analysis of 48 not-for-profit hospital systems, my colleague Bob Herman last year found that their net profit margin was 8.6%.
  • Bob has also reported that "not-for-profit hospital systems increasingly operate more like corporate titans on the stock exchanges than the charities they promote themselves to be."
  • Private insurers pay hospitals, on average, 241% of what Medicare pays for the same services, and hospitals are by far the largest contributor to U.S. health spending.

Go deeper: How "Medicare for All" would affect hospitals

Go deeper

The TikTok deal's for-show provisions and flimsy foundations

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The new deal to rescue TikTok from a threatened U.S. ban — full of provisions aimed at creating the temporary appearance of a presidential win — looks like a sort of Potemkin village agreement.

How it works: Potemkin villages were fake-storefront towns stood up to impress a visiting czar and dignitaries. When the visitors left, the stage set got struck.

  • Similarly, many elements of this plan look hastily erected and easily abandoned once the spotlight moves on.
27 mins ago - Technology

Over 3 million U.S. voters have already registered on social media

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

An estimated 2.5 million+ Americans have registered to vote on Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger, Facebook announced Monday. More than 733,000 Americans have registered to vote so far via Snapchat.

Why it matters: The broad reach of social media platforms makes them uniquely effective at engaging voters — especially younger voters who may not know how to register to vote or be civically engaged.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
46 mins ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street: Recession is over

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. economic activity fell more sharply in the second quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history. It's also going to grow more sharply in the third quarter of this year than during any other quarter in history.

  • The recession is over, according to Wall Street, with current forecasts showing sustained economic growth through 2021 and beyond.