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Photo: ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

Axios keeps talking about how hospitals are filling up around the country. But as most of us took a break from the news over the last few days, the situation only worsened.

Driving the news: More hospitals are running out of beds or turning away new patients, limiting the care available to both coronavirus patients and those with other health care emergencies.

The big picture: Meanwhile, the death toll continues to climb. In nine states — New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Louisiana, Rhode Island, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Dakota — more than 1 in every 1,000 people have now died of coronavirus-related causes, per the WaPo.

Between the lines: The pandemic is abstract enough to millions of Americans that they traveled for Thanksgiving, and millions more continue to go about their daily lives. Meanwhile, health care workers are exhausted and burnt out, no longer celebrated as heroes the way they were in the spring.

  • “Nobody’s clapping anymore,” Jessica Gold, a psychiatrist at Washington University in St. Louis, told the NYT. “They’re over it.”

What we're watching: “Once you go over the case cliff, where you have so many cases that you overwhelm the system...you’re going to see mortality rates go up substantially,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told the NYT.

  • “I shudder to imagine what things might be like in two weeks.”

Go deeper

Jan 23, 2021 - World

Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

Containers carrying doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine arrive in Brazil. Photo: Maurio Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil on Saturday began distributing the 2 million doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine that arrived from India Friday, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Brazil has the third highest COVID-19 case-count in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The 2 million doses "only scratch the surface of the shortfall," Brazilian public health experts told the AP.

Latest James Bond movie release delayed for third time

An advertisement poster featuring Daniel Craig in the new James Bond movie "No Time to Die" in Bangkok, Thailand. Photo: Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images

The release of the latest James Bond film, "No Time to Die," has been postponed for the third time as the coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate Hollywood.

The state of play: The film's release, initially scheduled for April 2020, was first postponed to November 2020, and then to April 2021. MGM said this week that movie's global debut will now be delayed until Oct. 8.

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