Ina Fried Sep 12
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Hands-on with Apple's new iPhone X (Video)

We (briefly) got our hands on one the iPhone X demo units after Apple introduced the high-end device. Here are some quick impressions, followed by a video of the device in action.

The iPhone X really does give you the best of both traditional iPhone models. You get the larger screen and dual cameras of the "plus" model in a phone not much bigger than the standard size one.

The facial recognition is the big "wow" feature. Face ID is the more impressive technological feat, but "animoji" — emoji that respond to your facial moves — are the most fun use of the facial recognition technology. It will be interesting to see what other uses Apple and developers make over time.

Those in the market for a new iPhone will have a tough choice. The iPhone X is the phone they are probably going to want, but they will have to wait more than a month longer than for the iPhone 8 (as we reported) and shell out at least $1,000. The iPhone 8, meanwhile, will be available sooner and starts at $699.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Stef Kight / Axios

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 8 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the NYT. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.