Photo: John Moore / Getty Images

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services issued guidance late Thursday night that would allow their officials to demand extra, detailed information — including worker contracts and itineraries — from companies who send H1-B workers to third-party worksites.

Why it matters: While this isn't a policy change, the memo specifically targets outsourcing firms, which account for the most H-1B labor filings, for potentially tougher scrutiny. These firms have been the focus of Homeland Security memos, proposed policy changes, and congressional bills introduced over the past year by the Trump administration, as they are often portrayed as taking advantage of the H-1B program at the expense of American workers.

Yes, but: The memo could also affect manufacturers, tool makers, designers, ad agencies, marketing firms, and anyone else who might sponsor an H-1B recipient and have them work at a client or partner’s site.

The memo stated the reason for the clarification as ensuring that all H-1B workers are employed in a "specialty occupation" and will remain in an employer-employee relationship with the company sponsoring their visas.

Go deeper: Tech firms aren't the biggest users of H-1B visas.

Go deeper

The Biden blowout scenario

Joe Biden speaks at an outdoor Black Economic Summit in Charlotte yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Joe Biden or President Trump could win the election narrowly — but only one in a popular and electoral vote blowout. 

Why it matters: A Biden blowout would mean a Democratic Senate, a bigger Democratic House and a huge political and policy shift nationwide.

52 mins ago - Technology

Justice's moves ring Big Tech with regulatory threats

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The Department of Justice proposed legislation to curb liability protections for tech platforms and moved a step closer toward an antitrust lawsuit against Google Wednesday.

The big picture: As President Trump faces re-election, lawmakers and regulators are hurriedly wrapping up investigations and circling Big Tech with regulatory threats.

Democrats' mail voting pivot

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Democrats spent the early months of the coronavirus pandemic urging their base to vote absentee. But as threats of U.S. Postal Service delays, Team Trump litigation and higher ballot rejection rates become clearer, many are pivoting to promote more in-person voting as well.

Why it matters: Democrats are exponentially more likely to vote by mail than Republicans this year — and if enough mail-in ballots are lost, rejected on a technicality or undercounted, it could change the outcome of the presidential election or other key races.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!