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The issue

The Trump administration is looking to overhaul the worker-visa program used by tech companies to hire high-skilled foreign workers for technical jobs they can't fill with Americans (aka H-1B) . The fixes are aimed at ensuring the program isn't used to bring in cheaper overseas labor to displace U.S. workers.

The facts
Expand chart
Data: Department of Labor; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

When companies hire workers with an H-1B visa, they have to provide notice, through a government filing, of the H-1B workers' wages and work locations. While labor filings don't directly correlate with number of workers, it reflects anticipated work locations for their total H-1B populations. The largest number of such filings are not filed by tech companies. Outsourcing firms Wipro, Infosys and Tata Consultancy Services account for the largest number, according to Labor Department data. The outsourcing firms rely heavily on H-1B visas to bring in workers, largely from India, to help staff corporate IT departments. These companies are known as "H-1B dependent," meaning more than 15 percent of their workforces hold visas, and account for the largest numbers of visa labor filings. (Nasscom, the trade group that represents Indian IT firms, has said it fully complies with immigration laws.)

Why it matters

Possible new restrictions on the program or a re-prioritized lottery system could change how tech companies and India-based IT consulting firms find technical workers. They could be required to hire Americans first and show they can't find the necessary talent at home to be eligible for visas. If companies do need to hire workers from overseas, preference may be given to companies paying the highest salaries. Congress also is working on reforms to tighten requirements.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
33 mins ago - Economy & Business

How GameStop exposed the market

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Retail traders have found a cheat code for the stock market, and barring some major action from regulatory authorities or a massive turn in their favored companies, they're going to keep using it to score "tendies" and turn Wall Street on its head.

What's happening: The share prices of companies like GameStop are rocketing higher, based largely on the social media organizing of a 3-million strong group of Redditors who are eagerly piling into companies that big hedge funds are short selling, or betting will fall in price.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period from Feb. 15 to May 15, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.

2 hours ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools.