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Data: eMarketer; Chart: Axios Visuals

Google is expected to net more than 71% of the U.S. search advertising spending this year, down from roughly 74.7% of market share in 2017, per eMarketer.

Why it matters: Google relies on search advertising for the majority of its revenue. The Department of Justice's antitrust lawsuit over its dominance of search threatens the core of its business.

Be smart: Over the past few years, Amazon has slowly started to give Google a run for its money in search advertising.

  • By 2021, it's expected to control nearly 16% of the search ad market, up from 6.5% in 2017.
  • Still, Amazon's search ad business can only really grow in line with its ecommerce business, as most of the search ads bought on its platform are purchased by marketers trying to boost their products in search results on Amazon.com. And Google is pushing hard to compete with Amazon and other platforms in shopping.

Yes, but: The picture isn't so rosy for Google. This year, it is expected to see its first advertising declines year-over-year in over a decade, due in large part to declines in ad spending by the embattled travel industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Nov 19, 2020 - Technology

Google Pay adds peer-to-peer payments and more

Image: Google

Google announced a significant expansion of its Google Pay service on Wednesday, adding peer-to-peer payments to its contactless payment system as well as a partnership with banks to incorporate banking and checking services next year.

Why it matters: Contactless payments can be a gateway to other financial services, as Apple has shown by expanding from Apple Pay to Apple Card.

Updated 22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.