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Google's ad crisis reaches the U.S.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai (Tsering Topgyal / AP)

Even though Google formally apologized for having ads run alongside extremist content on its properties (like YouTube), and vowed to take steps to fix the problem, some of America's largest companies say they will still pull all of their non-search ads from the platform.

An AT&T rep confirmed to Recode that it's pulling all display ads globally until Google can ensure "this won't happen again." Verizon says in a statement they are working to "understand the weak links so we can prevent this from happening in the future." The Times reports pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline is also pulling its display ads.

Why it matters: Prior to Tuesday, dozens of U.K. brands, including the U.K. government, were leading the charge in pulling ads after they had appeared next to controversial content. Now that U.S. heavyweights are taking action, Google may have a serious branding (and potentially revenue) problem. Google's display ad business is already expected to drop 12.5% in market share this year, setting them billions of dollars behind Facebook. Facebook is experiencing similar extremism problems with Facebook Live, but thus far advertisers haven't been pulling out to the same extent because mid-roll ads haven't launched on Facebook's video platform yet.

Mike Allen 4 hours ago
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A White House olive branch: no plan to fire Mueller

Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

After a weekend at war with the Mueller investigation, the White House is extending an olive branch. Ty Cobb, the White House lawyer handling the probe, plans to issue this statement:

“In response to media speculation and related questions being posed to the Administration, the White House yet again confirms that the President is not considering or discussing the firing of the Special Counsel, Robert Mueller.”

Why it matters: The White House strategy had been to cooperate with Mueller. So this is an effort to turn down the temperature after a weekend of increasingly personal provocations aimed at the special counsel.

Jonathan Swan 6 hours ago
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Trump's trade plan that would blow up the WTO

President Trump announces tariffs on steel and aluminum earlier this month, flanked by Steven Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Robert Lighthizer, and Peter Navarro. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

For months, President Donald Trump has been badgering his economic advisors to give him broad, unilateral authority to raise tariffs — a move that would all but break the World Trade Organization.

His favorite word: “reciprocal.” He’s always complaining to staff about the fact that the U.S. has much lower tariffs on some foreign goods than other countries have on the same American-made goods. The key example is cars: The European Union has a 10 percent tariff on all cars, including those manufactured in America, and China hits all foreign-made cars with 25 percent tariffs. But the U.S. only charges 2.5 percent for foreign cars we import.