Photo: S3studio/Getty Images

Amazon and Google could face increased antitrust scrutiny after federal regulators agreed to split oversight of the tech giants, The Washington Post reported Saturday night, citing 3 people familiar with the matter.

Details: Under the agreement, the Federal Trade Commission would be responsible for oversight of Amazon, while Google would come under the watch of the Justice Department, the Post said, adding the sources spoke on the condition of anonymity "because the government’s work is confidential."

Why it matters: The apparent increased regulatory scrutiny in the United States comes at a time when President Trump has attacked the companies by name.

The big picture: The Federal Trade Commission previously directed a separate Google antitrust investigation, looking at the company's search and advertising practices and the negative impact on competitors. However, the probe was dropped in 2013. The company chose to make a handful of changes as a result.

Go deeper: Tech's regulation debate moves from "whether" to "how"

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10 mins ago - Technology

Justice's moves ring Big Tech with regulatory threats

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The Department of Justice proposed legislation to curb liability protections for tech platforms and moved a step closer toward an antitrust lawsuit against Google Wednesday.

The big picture: As President Trump faces re-election, lawmakers and regulators are hurriedly wrapping up investigations and circling Big Tech with regulatory threats.

Democrats' mail voting pivot

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Democrats spent the early months of the coronavirus pandemic urging their base to vote absentee. But as threats of U.S. Postal Service delays, Team Trump litigation and higher ballot rejection rates become clearer, many are pivoting to promote more in-person voting as well.

Why it matters: Democrats are exponentially more likely to vote by mail than Republicans this year — and if enough mail-in ballots are lost, rejected on a technicality or undercounted, it could change the outcome of the presidential election or other key races.

New interactive tool shows Biden's mail voting danger

Data: SurveyMonkey; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Voters who disapprove of President Trump most strongly are by far the most likely to vote by mail in the presidential election, according to an Axios analysis of exclusive data from SurveyMonkey and Tableau.

Why it matters: The new data shows just how strongly the mail-in vote is likely to favor Joe Biden — with potentially enormous implications in the swing states due to the greater risk of rejection with mail ballots.

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