Apr 23, 2020 - Health

Gilead's coronavirus drug flops in first major trial

Vials of remdesivir, which is administered intravenously. Photo: Ulrich Perrey/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir, the drug made by Gilead Sciences that is being tested on coronavirus patients, "was not associated with clinical or virological benefits," according to a leaked summary of a randomized trial posted by the World Health Organization and viewed by STAT and the Financial Times on Thursday.

Why it matters: Experts have placed a lot of hope in remdesivir as an antiviral treatment for COVID-19, but the preliminary results of this study dash a lot of that hope. However, the study is still undergoing peer review, and Gilead is arguing the results weren't characterized appropriately.

Go deeper

Updated 16 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

Latin America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East all recorded spikes in coronavirus infections Thursday as cases spread to new hot spots worldwide.

By the numbers: More than 6.5 million people have tested positive for COVID-19 worldwide and over 2.8 million have recovered from the virus. Over 387,000 people have died globally. The U.S. has reported the most cases in the world with over 1.8 million.

May 22, 2020 - Health

Update: Study linking hydroxychloroquine to increased death risk is retracted

Hydroxychloroquine. Photo: George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

Editor’s note: The study referenced in this story has been retracted by the medical journal The Lancet due to questions on the veracity of its primary data sources. Read more here.

Coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine or its related drug chloroquine were more likely to die or develop an irregular heart rhythm that can lead to sudden cardiac death, compared to those who did nothing, a retrospective review published in The Lancet shows.

Why it matters: Despite warnings from the Food and Drug Administration, President Trump has insisted the anti-malarial drug as a "game-changer" and admitted he has taken it as a preventative even though the drug is unproven.

14 hours ago - Health

Medical journal retracts study that fueled hydroxychloroquine concerns

Photo: George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

The Lancet medical journal retracted a study on Thursday that found that coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine had a higher mortality rate and increased heart problem than those who did nothing, stating that the authors were "unable to complete an independent audit of the data underpinning their analysis."

Why it matters: The results of the study, which claimed to have analyzed data from nearly 96,000 patients on six continents, led several governments to ban the use of the anti-malarial drug for coronavirus patients due to safety concerns.