Feb 23, 2020 - World

Thousands gather in Germany to mourn 9 killed in racist shooting

Protesters in Hanau, Germany, march with banners and flags of the Syrian region Rojava. Photo: Michael Debets/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Approximately 10,000 people marched in the town of Hanau, Germany, Sunday to mourn the deaths of nine victims who were killed by an anti-immigrant gunman last Wednesday, AP reports.

Catch up quick: The attacker killed the nine people — five of which were reportedly Turkish citizens — in Hanau, a suburb of Frankfurt, before turning the gun on his mother and himself. He left behind racist videos and texts in which he called for genocide and claimed that he'd been surveilled since birth.

The big picture: Per AP, this was Germany's third deadly attack inspired by far-right views in just a few months. Since Chancellor Angela Merkel permitted a wave of over 1 million refugees to enter the country during the height of the migrant crisis in 2015, Germany's far-right, anti-immigrant AfD party has seen historic electoral success. It now has representation in all 16 regional parliaments.

In photos
Marchers raise photos, believed to be of the victims, during a vigil. Photo: Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images
A woman lights a candle in honor of the victims. Photo: Xinhua/Lu Yang via Getty Images
Mourners walk through Hanau on Market Square. Photo: Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images.

Go deeper: Hate crimes reach 16-year high, according to FBI report

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In photos: Top destinations before and after coronavirus outbreak

The Eiffel Tower in Paris. Photos: Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images; Stephane Cardinale-Corbis via Getty Images

The U.S. travel and tourism sector is set for a drop of 6 million international visitors because of the novel coronavirus, costing $19 billion in spending this year, per a report by Tourism Economics. "The present declines appear likely to be worse than what the US experienced in 2003 [after the SARS outbreak]," the report states.

The big picture: The global outlook is just as bleak. The report was released on March 11, two days after Italy announced a nationwide lockdown after a surge in cases. Since then, several countries have followed suit, European travelers face U.S. travel restrictions and the CDC has recommended gatherings of 50 or more people be postponed or canceled for eight weeks. The outbreak's impact is evident at many top travel destinations, where once-bustling hubs have been transformed into virtual ghost towns.

See photosArrowMar 17, 2020 - Health

In photos: How coronavirus is impacting cities around the world

Revellers take part in the "Plague Doctors Procession" in Venice on Tuesday night during the usual period of the Carnival festivities, most of which have been canceled following the coronavirus outbreak in northern Italy. Photo: Andrea Pattaro/AFP via Getty Images

The novel coronavirus has spread from China to infect people in more than 40 countries and territories around the world, killing over 2,700 people.

The big picture: Most of the 80,000 COVID-19 infections have occurred in mainland China. But cases are starting to surge elsewhere. By Wednesday morning, the worst affected countries outside China were South Korea (1,146), where a U.S. soldier tested positive to the virus, Italy (332), Japan (170), Iran (95) and Singapore (91). On Tuesday, new cases were confirmed in Switzerland, Croatia and Algeria.

See photosArrowFeb 26, 2020 - World

How Super Tuesday is unfolding

A voter takes part in the Democratic primary in Purcellville, Virginia. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Voters in 14 states and one territory cast their ballots on Super Tuesday, tweeting and blogging along the way.

Why it matters: The huge delegate hauls of California and Texas this year make the day about as close as the U.S. gets to a national presidential primary.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Mar 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy